LaCava Center Integrative Medical Highlights

Lyme Disease

Our knowledge of Lyme Disease surfaced in the early 1970s, when a mysterious group of rheumatoid arthritis cases occurred among children in Lyme, Connecticut, and two neighboring towns. Since then we have learned that Lyme Disease has been around for thousands upon thousands of years. It is caused by a corkscrew-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme can affect any organ of the body, including: muscles and joints, the brain and nervous system, and the heart. Lyme is called “The Great Imitator,” because its symptoms mimic many other diseases. Patients with Lyme disease are frequently misdiagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and various psychiatric illnesses, including depression. This has proven true at The LaCava Center where many patients who have been diagnosed with such illnesses, come to us only to find out that Lyme Disease was the culprit all along.

Lyme’s disease is primarily caused by a tick bite. However, it is also believed by many that Horsefly’s, Deer Fly’s, and other insects such as Mosquitoes are transmitters of the disease as well. Unfortunately, many people believe that if they are bitten by a tick that they only need to worry if a red bulls-eye shows up on their skin. Nothing could be further from the truth! It is estimated that only 16% of patients diagnosed with Lyme disease know of a tick bite, and only a third to a half of people have the bulls-eye rash. Furthermore, ticks are hosts to a number of other viruses and parasites including: Heartland Virus, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Babesiosis, Bartonella, and Anaplasmosis. Click here for more.

Although the prevailing logic is that Lyme is an East Coast disease, it is found throughout the United States, as well as in more than sixty other countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. About 1.5 times more than the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times more than the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the US. However, because of Lyme’s nature it often goes undetected leading many experts to believe the true number of cases is much higher.

At The LaCava Center we have noticed Lyme to be a very smart and debilitating disease. We have seen many cases of false negatives in lab testing and even cases where previous treatment proved ineffective resulting in Chronic Lyme. Such cases caused us to search for a lab with the expertise to properly test for Lyme’s existence. After trial and error, we found just such an experiences lab and now partner with it for almost all of our Lyme testing.

If you have suffered from a debilitating disease and have not gotten better, we encourage you to give us a call today. Also please feel free to check out some of the websites below for resources related to Lyme Disease.

www.lymedisease.org

www.cdc.gov

www.ilads.org

www.webmd.com

LEARN MORE

Cancer

In 2016, there will be an estimated 1,685,210 new cancer cases diagnosed and 595,690 cancer deaths in the US. Cancer.org. It seems everyone has been touched in some way by this terrible epidemic. Either you know of someone who has had cancer or worse yet, you have cancer. For many, this diagnosis is almost a certified death sentence. But, at The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine we believe that it doesn’t have to be this way.

In the mid 90’s, Dr. LaCava was personally touched by cancer when his Father was diagnosed with stomach cancer. In essence, his Father became his first cancer patient. Since then, Dr. LaCava has treated hundreds of cancer patients spanning the spectrum of ages, stages, and types of cancer. Utilizing an Integrative Oncology approach, The LaCava Center utilizes evidence based complementary therapies in concert with traditional medical treatments, in an effort to improve overall efficacy and symptom control, while also working to alleviate patient distress and suffering. 

As a founding member of the International Organization of Integrative Cancer Physicians, Dr. LaCava has helped to pioneer the Integrative Oncology approach to cancer treatment, and further continues his ongoing and evolving education in this field through membership with such groups as Best Answer for Cancer. As an example of our practices ongoing evolution, with passage in Illinois of the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, and the opening of Medical Cannabis dispensaries in November of 2015, Dr. LaCava expanded The LaCava Center’s treatments by utilizing high THC medical cannabis as a therapy to alleviate pain in cancer patients. Moreover, encouraged by the research surrounding Cannabidiol (CBD) and it’s potential as an adjunctive cancer therapy, we have begun to explore its efficacy by utilizing high CBD and low THC strains of medical cannabis. By doing so, we continue to innovate and provide our patients with the very best that integrative and alternative medicine has to offer.

LEARN MORE

Mold Exposure

Exposure to mold can be a very serious health concern that is often overlooked in conventional medicine. Mold and fungus produce very toxic chemicals called mycotoxins.

Different species of Mold produce different toxins and people will suffer a wide range of different symptoms. The symptom picture often includes:

  • Brain Fog
  • Depression or Mood Swings
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Skin Sensitivity and Rashes
  • Unexplained allergic sensitivities and immune hypersensitivity
  • Headaches
  • Breathing Problems
  • Memory Loss, short term
  • Chronic Sinusitis, Ear Infections or Bronchitis
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting

Mold Sickness and related illnesses from Mold Exposure are real. Mold has been linked to Lung Damage, Brain Damage, Cancer and even Death. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Journals of American Medicine, all agree that Mold Fine Particulate are dangerous to human health.

We work with Croft Pathology to have your excretion of mycotoxins measured. Testing of your environment may also be warranted to determine the site and degree of exposure. In some cases a tissue biopsy may be necessary, this can be helpful in legal cases.

Upon determination of mycotoxin severity, a treatment protocol will be implemented. This may include, dietary changes, nutritional supplements, pharmaceutical anti-fungals, therapeutic baths and recommendations for your living or work environment.

LEARN MORE

Ozone Therapy (Oxidative IV)

Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

To understand Bio-oxidative Medicine it is important to first differentiate the terms Oxygenation and Oxidation. These terms refer to two different metabolic processes that are unrelated.

Oxygenation signifies an increase in the number of oxygen molecules especially as it relates to the uptake and utilization of oxygen at the cellular level. Although Oxygenation therapies can help improve health, they are not part of Bio-oxidative Medicine. However, Oxygenation therapies can be used in conjunction with the therapies used in Bio-oxidative Medicine.

In chemistry, Oxidation is the loss or transfer of electrons from one atom or molecule to another. The opposite of oxidation is reduction in which electrons are gained. Together, this exchange of electrons, called reduction and oxidation, is referred to as redox. All life processes are dependent upon redox. Redox initiates chemical reactions. Life and healing are dependent on a dynamic chemical balance in the body and that chemical balance is dependent on redox. Improving healthy redox is the foundation of Bio-Oxidative Medicine.

As a result of many factors in modern life, such as excess stress, poor nutrition, exposure to radiation and pollution of our air, water and food, the body’s oxidative and antioxidant systems can become overwhelmed. This results in a negative effect on the function of the cells in the body and on the body’s immune system and its ability to defend against infections, allergens, toxins, carcinogens and other stresses of life. Bio-oxidative therapies, like the use of Hydrogen Peroxide Therapy and Ozone Therapy, stimulate the body’s redox systems and help return the body to balance and health.Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

LEARN MORE

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT)

Insulin potentiation therapy (IPT) has been around for a long time. IPT was discovered by Donato Perez Garcia, M.D., and developed by him in Mexico City during the 1930s and 1940s. Following its discovery, its chief practitioners were three generations of the Garcia doctors, who called it cellular therapy or Donatian therapy. In the 1970s or 1980s it was renamed IPT.

IPT (Insulin Potentiation Therapy) is a medical procedure that uses the hormone insulin, followed by glucose, to deliver drugs to the body in smaller doses. The process helps to utilize and concentrate the particular drugs introduced, thus helping to make them more effective, while also helping to reduce possible side effects.

LEARN MORE

Reach Out For More Info!

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your Phone (required)

Your Message

Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.

Baltimore Integrative Medicine

Baltimore, Maryland

Baltimore is the largest city in the U.S. state of Maryland, and the 29th-most populous city in the country. It was established by the Constitution of Maryland and is not part of any county; thus, it is the largest independent city in the United States. Baltimore has more public monuments per capita than any other city in the country and is home to some of the earliest National Register historic districts in the nation, including Fell’s Point (1969), Federal Hill (1970) and Mount Vernon Place (1971). More than 65,000 properties, or roughly one in three buildings in the city, are listed on the National Register, more than any other city in the nation.

Founded in 1729, Baltimore is the second largest seaport in the Mid-Atlantic. Baltimore’s Inner Harbor was once the second leading port of entry for immigrants to the United States and a major manufacturing center. After a decline in major manufacturing, industrialization and rail transportation, Baltimore shifted to a service-oriented economy, with the Johns Hopkins Hospital (founded 1889), and Johns Hopkins University (founded 1876), now the city’s top two employers.

Baltimore had a population of 621,849 in 2015; in 2010, that of Baltimore Metropolitan Area was 2.7 million, the 21st largest in the country.

With hundreds of identified districts, Baltimore has been dubbed “a city of neighborhoods”. Famous residents have included the writers Edgar Allan Poe, Edith Hamilton, Frederick Douglass, and H.L. Mencken; jazz musician James “Eubie” Blake; singer Billie Holiday; actor and filmmaker John Waters; and baseball player Babe Ruth. In the War of 1812, Francis Scott Key wrote The Star-Spangled Banner, later the American national anthem, in the city. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltimore)

Things To Do In Baltimore:

Come Spend A Day In Baltimore!

Must See in Baltimore
No first time trip to Baltimore is complete without visiting these sites:

Oriole Park at Camden Yards is the home of the Orioles and one of the most hallowed locations in all of baseball. The ballpark itself ushered in the retro design movement in baseball stadium construction and consistently ranks among the top places in the nation to catch a game.

The National Aquarium is, arguably, the nation’s best. Here you can thrill to the dolphin show and afterwards toddle over to the indoor rainforest while enjoying the 16,000 marine creatures that call this aquatic cathedral home.

Fort McHenry is the National Park site where the Star Spangled Banner was born. Francis Scott Key was inspired to write the words to the national anthem when he saw the fortification (and the flag that flew over it) withstand a massive assault by the British navy way back in 1814.

Where to Stay in Baltimore
If you’re feeling ritzy, plant your flag in the Harbor East neighborhood at the Four Seasons. You’ll be walking distance from the attraction-heavy Inner Harbor and Fells Point areas, plus the Italian food in nearby little Italy is terrific.

For a classic Baltimore experience, stay in the Mount Vernon neighborhood at one of the many vintage hotels. The cultural heart of the city, Mount Vernon boasts the nation’s first true monument to George Washington, as well as America’s first Catholic Cathedral. The Walters Art Museum and the Peabody Library provide additional highlights.

As a rule of thumb, stick closer to the Inner Harbor if you’ve got the family in town as you’ll appreciate the tourist friendly atmosphere and easy access to the tall ships and National Aquarium.

Best and Worst Time to go to Baltimore
Early fall (September, October) is prime for visitation. The weather is pleasant, the Orioles are playing, and the crowds are manageable. Although spring and summer are lovely, the tourists are out in force, making it feel crowded.

Where to Get Lost in Baltimore
Walking along the cobblestone streets in Fells Point is like stepping back in time as this picturesque waterfront neighborhood dates back to the early 1700s. There are a myriad of interesting shops, eateries and watering holes to wander through. If you can’t find a good crab cake sandwich in this eternally charming enclave, you’re not looking hard enough.

The Best Deal in Baltimore
Free fun can be found in Little Italy just beside the Inner Harbor. Make your way over to D’Alesandro’s Park off Stiles Street to watch the locals play bocce and maybe toss a ball or two yourself. Then adjourn to Joe Benny’s Focacceria for great atmosphere and delicious meatballs at a price that can’t be beat. (source: https://www.mapquest.com/us/md/baltimore-282039684)

Education in Baltimore

About Baltimore educational system

Colleges and universities

Baltimore is the home of numerous places of higher learning, both public and private. 100,000 college students from around the country attend Baltimore City’s 12 accredited two-year or four-year colleges and universities. Among them are:

Private

Keyser Quadrangle in Spring at the Johns Hopkins University the first research university in the United States.

Interior of the George Peabody Library at the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University. It is considered one of the most beautiful libraries in the world.

  • The Johns Hopkins University
  • Baltimore International College
  • Loyola University Maryland
  • Maryland Institute College of Art
  • St. Mary’s Seminary and University
  • Notre Dame of Maryland University
  • The Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University
  • Sojourner–Douglass College
  • Stratford University (Baltimore campus)

Public

  • Baltimore City Community College
  • Coppin State University
  • Morgan State University
  • University of Baltimore
  • University of Maryland, Baltimore

Primary and secondary schools

The city’s public schools are managed by Baltimore City Public Schools and include schools that have been well known in the area: Carver Vocational-Technical High School, the first African American vocational high school and center that was established in the state of Maryland; Digital Harbor High School, one of the secondary schools that emphasizes information technology; Lake Clifton Eastern High School, which is the largest school campus in Baltimore City of physical size; the historic Frederick Douglass High School, which is the second oldest African American high school in the United States; Baltimore City College, the third oldest public high school in the country; and Western High School, the oldest public all-girls school in the nation. Baltimore City College (also known as “City”) and Baltimore Polytechnic Institute (also known as “Poly”) share the nation’s second-oldest high school football rivalry. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltimore#Education)

History Of Baltimore:

Baltimore is rich in history!

The city is named after Cecil Calvert, second Lord Baltimore, (1605–1675), of the Irish House of Lords and founding proprietor of the Province of Maryland. Baltimore Manor was the name of the estate in County Longford on which the Calvert family lived in Ireland. Baltimore is an anglicization of the Irish name Baile an Tí Mhóir, meaning “town of the big house.”

In 1608, Captain John Smith traveled 210 miles from Jamestown to the uppermost Chesapeake Bay, leading the first European expedition to the Patapsco River  The name “Patapsco” is derived from pota-psk-ut, which translates to “backwater” or “tide covered with froth” in Algonquian dialect. A quarter century after John Smith’s voyage, English colonists began to settle in Maryland. The area constituting the modern City of Baltimore and its metropolitan area was first settled by David Jones in 1661. He claimed the area known today as Harbor East on the east bank of the Jones Falls stream, which flows south into Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.

In the early 1600s, the immediate Baltimore vicinity was sparsely populated, if at all, by Native Americans. The Baltimore County area northward was used as hunting grounds by the Susquehannocks living in the lower Susquehanna River valley who “controlled all of the upper tributaries of the Chesapeake” but “refrained from much contact with Powhatan in the Potomac region.” Pressured by the Susquehannocks, the Piscataway tribe of Algonquians stayed well south of the Baltimore area and inhabited primarily the north bank of the Potomac River in what is now Charles and southern Prince George’s south of the Fall Line. The Baltimore area had been inhabited by Native Americans since at least the 10th millennium BC, when Paleo-Indians first settled in the region. One Paleo-Indian site and several Archaic period and Woodland period archaeological sites have been identified in Baltimore, including four from the Late Woodland period. During the Late Woodland period, the archaeological culture that is called the “Potomac Creek complex” resided in the area from Baltimore to the Rappahannock River in Virginia.

The current Baltimore on the Patapsco River was established in 1729, but an earlier Baltimore existed on the Bush River as early as 1674, The first county seat of Baltimore County is known today as “Old Baltimore”. It was located on the Bush River on land that in 1773 became part of Harford County. In 1674, the General Assembly passed “An Act for erecting [sic] a Court-house and Prison in each County within this Province.” The site of the court house and jail for Baltimore County was evidently “Old Baltimore” near the Bush River. We know this because in 1683, the General Assembly passed “An Act for Advancement of Trade” to “establish towns, ports, and places of trade, within the province.” One of the towns established by the act in Baltimore County was “on Bush River, on Town Land, near the Court-House.” The court house on the Bush River referenced in the 1683 Act was in all likelihood the one created by the 1674 Act. “Old Baltimore” was in existence as early as 1674, but we don’t know with certainty what if anything happened on the site prior to that year. The exact location of Old Baltimore was lost for years. It was certain that the location was somewhere on the site of the present-day Aberdeen Proving Grounds (APG), a U.S. Army testing facility. APG’s Cultural Resource Management Program took up the task of finding Old Baltimore. The firm of R. Christopher Goodwin & Associates (Goodwin) was contracted for the project. After Goodwin first performed historical and archival work, they coordinated their work with existing landscape features to locate the site of Old Baltimore. APG’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal personnel went in with Goodwin to defuse any unexploded ordnance. The field team worked from fall 1997 through winter 1998. The team dug 420 test pits, and they uncovered several artifacts. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltimore#History)

Baltimore Neighborhood

Check out Baltimore Neighborhood!

Baltimore is a very large coastal city (i.e. on the ocean, a bay, or inlet) located in the state of Maryland. With a population of 622,793 people and 219 constituent neighborhoods, Baltimore is the largest community in Maryland. Much of the housing stock in Baltimore was built prior to World War II, making it one of the older and more historic cities in the country.

Unlike some cities where white-collar or blue-collar occupations dominate the local economy, Baltimore is neither predominantly one nor the other. Instead, it has a mixed workforce of both white- and blue-collar jobs. Overall, Baltimore is a city of professionals, sales and office workers and service providers. There are especially a lot of people living in Baltimore who work in office and administrative support (14.58%), sales jobs (8.64%) and management occupations (7.88%).

Also of interest is that Baltimore has more people living here who work in computers and math than 95% of the places in the US.

Baltimore is one of the most attractive larger cities for people who are young, single, educated, and upwardly-mobile career starters. This makes it a good place to live for young singles in their 20s and 30s and who have undergraduate or graduate degrees and are starting their professional careers. Although Baltimore is a large city, this demographic is significant enough that young professionals will find many others like themselves here, with really good opportunities for friendships, recreation, romance, and more.

One of the nice things about Baltimore is that it is nautical, which means that parts of it are somewhat historic and touch the ocean or tidal bodies of water, such as inlets and bays. Because of this, visitors and locals will often go to these areas to take in the scenery or to enjoy waterfront activities.

One downside of living in Baltimore is that it can take a long time to commute to work. In Baltimore, the average commute to work is 30.48 minutes, which is quite a bit higher than the national average. On the other hand, local public transit is widely used in the city, so leaving the car at home and taking transit is often a viable alternative. In addition, it is also a pedestrian-friendly city. Many of Baltimore’s neighborhoods are dense enough and have amenities close enough together that people find it feasible to get around on foot.

Baltimore is a big city, and with that comes lots of benefits. One benefit is that most big cities have public transit, but Baltimore really shines when it comes to the extensiveness and use of its public transit system. More than most large American cities, Baltimore citizens use public transit daily to get to and from work. And while there are transportation options, most people in Baltimore ride the bus. Whereas in some cities one is destined to sit in traffic every morning to get to work and every evening to get home, in Baltimore a lot leave their cars at home (if they even choose to own one), and hop a ride on the bus.

Baltimore is an extremely ethnically-diverse city. The people who call Baltimore home describe themselves as belonging to a variety of racial and ethnic groups. The greatest number of Baltimore residents report their race to be Black or African-American, followed by White. Important ancestries of people in Baltimore include German, Irish, English, Italian, African and Polish.

The most common language spoken in Baltimore is English. Some people also speak Spanish.  (source: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/md/baltimore/)

Reach Out For More Info!

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your Phone (required)

Your Message

Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.