LaCava Center Integrative Medical Highlights

Lyme Disease

Our knowledge of Lyme Disease surfaced in the early 1970s, when a mysterious group of rheumatoid arthritis cases occurred among children in Lyme, Connecticut, and two neighboring towns. Since then we have learned that Lyme Disease has been around for thousands upon thousands of years. It is caused by a corkscrew-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme can affect any organ of the body, including: muscles and joints, the brain and nervous system, and the heart. Lyme is called “The Great Imitator,” because its symptoms mimic many other diseases. Patients with Lyme disease are frequently misdiagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and various psychiatric illnesses, including depression. This has proven true at The LaCava Center where many patients who have been diagnosed with such illnesses, come to us only to find out that Lyme Disease was the culprit all along.

Lyme’s disease is primarily caused by a tick bite. However, it is also believed by many that Horsefly’s, Deer Fly’s, and other insects such as Mosquitoes are transmitters of the disease as well. Unfortunately, many people believe that if they are bitten by a tick that they only need to worry if a red bulls-eye shows up on their skin. Nothing could be further from the truth! It is estimated that only 16% of patients diagnosed with Lyme disease know of a tick bite, and only a third to a half of people have the bulls-eye rash. Furthermore, ticks are hosts to a number of other viruses and parasites including: Heartland Virus, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Babesiosis, Bartonella, and Anaplasmosis. Click here for more.

Although the prevailing logic is that Lyme is an East Coast disease, it is found throughout the United States, as well as in more than sixty other countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. About 1.5 times more than the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times more than the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the US. However, because of Lyme’s nature it often goes undetected leading many experts to believe the true number of cases is much higher.

At The LaCava Center we have noticed Lyme to be a very smart and debilitating disease. We have seen many cases of false negatives in lab testing and even cases where previous treatment proved ineffective resulting in Chronic Lyme. Such cases caused us to search for a lab with the expertise to properly test for Lyme’s existence. After trial and error, we found just such an experiences lab and now partner with it for almost all of our Lyme testing.

If you have suffered from a debilitating disease and have not gotten better, we encourage you to give us a call today. Also please feel free to check out some of the websites below for resources related to Lyme Disease.

www.lymedisease.org

www.cdc.gov

www.ilads.org

www.webmd.com

LEARN MORE

Cancer

In 2016, there will be an estimated 1,685,210 new cancer cases diagnosed and 595,690 cancer deaths in the US. Cancer.org. It seems everyone has been touched in some way by this terrible epidemic. Either you know of someone who has had cancer or worse yet, you have cancer. For many, this diagnosis is almost a certified death sentence. But, at The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine we believe that it doesn’t have to be this way.

In the mid 90’s, Dr. LaCava was personally touched by cancer when his Father was diagnosed with stomach cancer. In essence, his Father became his first cancer patient. Since then, Dr. LaCava has treated hundreds of cancer patients spanning the spectrum of ages, stages, and types of cancer. Utilizing an Integrative Oncology approach, The LaCava Center utilizes evidence based complementary therapies in concert with traditional medical treatments, in an effort to improve overall efficacy and symptom control, while also working to alleviate patient distress and suffering. 

As a founding member of the International Organization of Integrative Cancer Physicians, Dr. LaCava has helped to pioneer the Integrative Oncology approach to cancer treatment, and further continues his ongoing and evolving education in this field through membership with such groups as Best Answer for Cancer. As an example of our practices ongoing evolution, with passage in Illinois of the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, and the opening of Medical Cannabis dispensaries in November of 2015, Dr. LaCava expanded The LaCava Center’s treatments by utilizing high THC medical cannabis as a therapy to alleviate pain in cancer patients. Moreover, encouraged by the research surrounding Cannabidiol (CBD) and it’s potential as an adjunctive cancer therapy, we have begun to explore its efficacy by utilizing high CBD and low THC strains of medical cannabis. By doing so, we continue to innovate and provide our patients with the very best that integrative and alternative medicine has to offer.

LEARN MORE

Mold Exposure

Exposure to mold can be a very serious health concern that is often overlooked in conventional medicine. Mold and fungus produce very toxic chemicals called mycotoxins.

Different species of Mold produce different toxins and people will suffer a wide range of different symptoms. The symptom picture often includes:

  • Brain Fog
  • Depression or Mood Swings
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Skin Sensitivity and Rashes
  • Unexplained allergic sensitivities and immune hypersensitivity
  • Headaches
  • Breathing Problems
  • Memory Loss, short term
  • Chronic Sinusitis, Ear Infections or Bronchitis
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting

Mold Sickness and related illnesses from Mold Exposure are real. Mold has been linked to Lung Damage, Brain Damage, Cancer and even Death. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Journals of American Medicine, all agree that Mold Fine Particulate are dangerous to human health.

We work with Croft Pathology to have your excretion of mycotoxins measured. Testing of your environment may also be warranted to determine the site and degree of exposure. In some cases a tissue biopsy may be necessary, this can be helpful in legal cases.

Upon determination of mycotoxin severity, a treatment protocol will be implemented. This may include, dietary changes, nutritional supplements, pharmaceutical anti-fungals, therapeutic baths and recommendations for your living or work environment.

LEARN MORE

Ozone Therapy (Oxidative IV)

Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

To understand Bio-oxidative Medicine it is important to first differentiate the terms Oxygenation and Oxidation. These terms refer to two different metabolic processes that are unrelated.

Oxygenation signifies an increase in the number of oxygen molecules especially as it relates to the uptake and utilization of oxygen at the cellular level. Although Oxygenation therapies can help improve health, they are not part of Bio-oxidative Medicine. However, Oxygenation therapies can be used in conjunction with the therapies used in Bio-oxidative Medicine.

In chemistry, Oxidation is the loss or transfer of electrons from one atom or molecule to another. The opposite of oxidation is reduction in which electrons are gained. Together, this exchange of electrons, called reduction and oxidation, is referred to as redox. All life processes are dependent upon redox. Redox initiates chemical reactions. Life and healing are dependent on a dynamic chemical balance in the body and that chemical balance is dependent on redox. Improving healthy redox is the foundation of Bio-Oxidative Medicine.

As a result of many factors in modern life, such as excess stress, poor nutrition, exposure to radiation and pollution of our air, water and food, the body’s oxidative and antioxidant systems can become overwhelmed. This results in a negative effect on the function of the cells in the body and on the body’s immune system and its ability to defend against infections, allergens, toxins, carcinogens and other stresses of life. Bio-oxidative therapies, like the use of Hydrogen Peroxide Therapy and Ozone Therapy, stimulate the body’s redox systems and help return the body to balance and health.Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

LEARN MORE

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT)

Insulin potentiation therapy (IPT) has been around for a long time. IPT was discovered by Donato Perez Garcia, M.D., and developed by him in Mexico City during the 1930s and 1940s. Following its discovery, its chief practitioners were three generations of the Garcia doctors, who called it cellular therapy or Donatian therapy. In the 1970s or 1980s it was renamed IPT.

IPT (Insulin Potentiation Therapy) is a medical procedure that uses the hormone insulin, followed by glucose, to deliver drugs to the body in smaller doses. The process helps to utilize and concentrate the particular drugs introduced, thus helping to make them more effective, while also helping to reduce possible side effects.

LEARN MORE

Reach Out For More Info!

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your Phone (required)

Your Message

Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.

Boise Integrative Medicine

Boise, Idaho

Boise  is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Idaho, as well as the county seat of Ada County. Located on the Boise River in southwestern Idaho.

As of the census of 2010, there were 205,671 people, 85,704 households, and 50,647 families residing in the city. The population densitywas 2,591.6 inhabitants per square mile (1,000.6/km2). There were 92,700 housing units at an average density of 1,168.1 per square mile (451.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.0% White, 1.5% African American, 0.7% Native American, 3.2% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 2.5% from other races, and 3.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.1% of the population.

There were 85,704 households of which 29.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44% were married couples living together, 10% had a woman householder with no husband present, 4.5% had a man householder with no wife present, and 41% were non-families. 31% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 3.

The median age in the city was 35. 23% of residents were under the age of 18; 11% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 29% were from 25 to 44; 26% were from 45 to 64; and 11% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49% men and 51% women.

The Boise-Nampa metropolitan area, also known as the Treasure Valley, includes five counties with a combined population of 664,422, the most populous metropolitan area in Idaho. It contains the state’s three largest cities; Boise, Nampa, and Meridian. Boise is the third most populous metropolitan area in the United States’ Pacific Northwest region, behind Seattle and Portland. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boise,_Idaho)

Things To Do In Boise:

Come Spend A Day In Boise!

Tourists should head straight for the Greenbelt path, the ultimate way to experience Boise’s best. The path, most of it paved, runs along 23 scenic miles of the Boise River. While it gives walkers and joggers a great place to stretch their legs, the Greenbelt is also the center of a larger system of 15 parks, the Warm Springs Golf Course and the Morrison Knudsen Nature Center. Greenbelt hikers and bikers can access the expansive Ridge to Rivers trail system, with more than 125 miles of paths among valleys and foothills.

The Greenbelt also passes a major cultural destination: Julia Davis Park. Here, Boise tourists can venture into the animal kingdom at Zoo Boise, home to 200 animals across 80 species. The zoo’s neighbor, the Boise Art Museum, has a permanent collection of more than 3,000 works. Also nearby, the Idaho State Historical Museum chronicles life in the region during the prehistoric era and early settlements, with fascinating details about local fur trading and the 1860 gold rush.

Across from the art museum, visit Boise’s tribute to human diversity at the Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial before crossing over the 8th Street Bridge. Follow the street northeast to Grove Street into Boise’s downtown (“BoDo” to locals) and its epicenter, the Grove. This open-air public square hosts a summer concert series and the Capital City Public Market, a popular place to buy locally produced food from April to December.

For lunch or dinner, try Bardenay Restaurant and Distillery. Named for an old sailors’ term for “cocktail,” Bardenay is known as the nation’s first distillery-restaurant. With inspired entrees like the rum pepper steak, the delicious and extensive gluten-free menu and inventive drinks, the popular eatery sends off each seafarer completely satisfied.

Next door to Bardenay, a top Boise attraction is stationed at 611 Grove St. The Basque Museum and Cultural Center is where tourists can explore the city’s heritage as the largest Basque-ancestry community outside of northern Spain. For an inside look at Idaho’s legislative tradition, Boise tourists can return to 8th Street and continue to West Jefferson Street and the imposing Idaho Capitol Building.

East of downtown, the Old Idaho Penitentiary is another top Boise attraction. Built in 1870, the stunning Romanesque structure confined more than 13,000 convicts within its sandstone walls before closing in 1973. The building is open year round for tourists eager to explore the prison’s 30 historic buildings, solitary confinement house and dreaded gallows.

Just 15 minutes south of Boise, the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area provides jailbirds a vision of freedom. The park boasts one of the country’s greatest concentrations of birds of prey, with some 24 species of raptors nesting, swooping and perching along the outskirts of the City of Trees. (source: https://www.mapquest.com/us/id/boise-282087392)

Education in Boise

About Boise educational system

The Independent School District of Boise City, commonly known as the Boise School District, is a comprehensive publicschool district in Boise, Idaho.

High Schools

  • Boise – (1902, 1882 as Central School)
  • Borah – (1958)
  • Capital – (1965)
  • Timberline – (1998)
  • East – (1952, 2009)
  • Fairmont – (1965)
  • Hillside – (1960)
  • Les Bois – (1994, 1998)
  • North – (1937: “Boise” until South opened in 1948)
  • Riverglen – (1998)
  • South – (1948, 2008)
  • West – (1952, 2008)

Elementary Schools

Thirty-two elementary schools, grades K–6.

  • Adams
  • Amity
  • Collister
  • Cynthia Mann
  • Garfield
  • Grace Jordan
  • Hawthorne
  • Hidden Springs
  • Highlands
  • Hillcrest
  • Horizon
  • Jefferson
  • Koelsch
  • Liberty
  • Longfellow
  • Lowell
  • Maple Grove

Post-secondary educational options in Boise include Boise State University (BSU) and a wide range of technical schools. The University of Idaho (UI) and Idaho State University(ISU) each maintain a satellite campus in Boise (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boise,_Idaho#Education)

History Of Boise:

Boise is rich in history!

Accounts differ about the origin of the name. One account credits Capt. B.L.E. Bonneville of the U.S. Army as its source. After trekking for weeks through dry and rough terrain, his exploration party reached an overlook with a view of the Boise River Valley. The place where they stood is called Bonneville Point, located on the Oregon Trail east of the city. According to the story, a French-speaking guide, overwhelmed by the sight of the verdant river, yelled “Les bois! Les bois!” (“The wood! The wood!”)—and the name stuck.

The name may instead derive from earlier mountain men, who named the river that flows through it. In the 1820s, French Canadian fur trappers set trap lines in the vicinity. Set in a high-desert area, the tree-lined valley of the Boise River became a distinct landmark, an oasis dominated by cottonwood trees. They called this “La rivière boisée”, which means “the wooded river.”

The area was called Boise long before the establishment of Fort Boise by the federal government. The original Fort Boise was 40 miles (64 km) west, near Parma, down the Boise River near its confluence with the Snake River at the Oregon border. This private sector defense was erected by the Hudson’s Bay Company in the 1830s. It was abandoned in the 1850s, but massacresalong the Oregon Trail prompted the U.S. Army to re-establish a fort in the area in 1863 during the U.S. Civil War.

The new location was selected because it was near the intersection of the Oregon Trail with a major road connecting the Boise Basin (Idaho City) and the Owyhee (Silver City) mining areas, both of which were booming. During the mid-1860s, Idaho City was the largest city in the Northwest, and as a staging area, Fort Boise grew rapidly; Boise was incorporated as a city 153 years ago in 1863. The first capital of the Idaho Territory was Lewiston in north central Idaho, which in 1863 was the largest community, exceeding the populations of Olympia and Seattle, Washington Territory and Portland, Oregon combined. The original territory was larger than Texas. But following the creation of Montana Territory, Boise was made the territorial capital of a much reduced Idaho in a controversial decision which overturned a district court ruling by a one-vote majority in the territorial supreme court along geographic lines in 1866. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boise,_Idaho#History)

Boise Neighborhood

Check out Boise Neighborhood!

 

Boise is a relatively large city located in the state of Idaho. With a population of 216,282 people and 44 constituent neighborhoods, Boise is the largest community in Idaho.

Boise real estate is some of the most expensive in Idaho, although Boise house values don’t compare to the most expensive real estate in the U.S.

Boise is a decidedly white-collar city, with fully 86.46% of the workforce employed in white-collar jobs, well above the national average. Overall, Boise is a city of professionals, sales and office workers and service providers. There are especially a lot of people living in Boise who work in office and administrative support (14.14%), sales jobs (11.77%) and management occupations (10.05%).

Also of interest is that Boise has more people living here who work in computers and math than 95% of the places in the US.

One thing noticeable about Boise, although not a huge city, is that it has a large population of people who are young, single, educated, and upwardly-mobile career starters. That’s because Boise is full of single people in their 20s and 30s and who have undergraduate or graduate degrees and are starting careers in professional occupations. This makes Boise a pretty good place for young, educated career starters looking to find many people like themselves, with good opportunities for friendships, socializing, romance, and fun.

The population of Boise is very well educated relative to most cities and towns in the nation, where the average community has 21.84% of its adult population holding a 4-year degree or higher: 39.11% of adults in Boise have a bachelor’s degree or even advanced degree.

The people who call Boise home describe themselves as belonging to a variety of racial and ethnic groups. The greatest number of Boise residents report their race to be White, followed by Asian. Important ancestries of people in Boise include German, English, Irish, Italian, Scottish and Norwegian.

The most common language spoken in Boise is English. Some people also speak Spanish.(source: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/id/boise/)

Reach Out For More Info!

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your Phone (required)

Your Message

Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.