LaCava Center Integrative Medical Highlights

Lyme Disease

Our knowledge of Lyme Disease surfaced in the early 1970s, when a mysterious group of rheumatoid arthritis cases occurred among children in Lyme, Connecticut, and two neighboring towns. Since then we have learned that Lyme Disease has been around for thousands upon thousands of years. It is caused by a corkscrew-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme can affect any organ of the body, including: muscles and joints, the brain and nervous system, and the heart. Lyme is called “The Great Imitator,” because its symptoms mimic many other diseases. Patients with Lyme disease are frequently misdiagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and various psychiatric illnesses, including depression. This has proven true at The LaCava Center where many patients who have been diagnosed with such illnesses, come to us only to find out that Lyme Disease was the culprit all along.

Lyme’s disease is primarily caused by a tick bite. However, it is also believed by many that Horsefly’s, Deer Fly’s, and other insects such as Mosquitoes are transmitters of the disease as well. Unfortunately, many people believe that if they are bitten by a tick that they only need to worry if a red bulls-eye shows up on their skin. Nothing could be further from the truth! It is estimated that only 16% of patients diagnosed with Lyme disease know of a tick bite, and only a third to a half of people have the bulls-eye rash. Furthermore, ticks are hosts to a number of other viruses and parasites including: Heartland Virus, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Babesiosis, Bartonella, and Anaplasmosis. Click here for more.

Although the prevailing logic is that Lyme is an East Coast disease, it is found throughout the United States, as well as in more than sixty other countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. About 1.5 times more than the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times more than the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the US. However, because of Lyme’s nature it often goes undetected leading many experts to believe the true number of cases is much higher.

At The LaCava Center we have noticed Lyme to be a very smart and debilitating disease. We have seen many cases of false negatives in lab testing and even cases where previous treatment proved ineffective resulting in Chronic Lyme. Such cases caused us to search for a lab with the expertise to properly test for Lyme’s existence. After trial and error, we found just such an experiences lab and now partner with it for almost all of our Lyme testing.

If you have suffered from a debilitating disease and have not gotten better, we encourage you to give us a call today. Also please feel free to check out some of the websites below for resources related to Lyme Disease.

www.lymedisease.org

www.cdc.gov

www.ilads.org

www.webmd.com

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Cancer

In 2016, there will be an estimated 1,685,210 new cancer cases diagnosed and 595,690 cancer deaths in the US. Cancer.org. It seems everyone has been touched in some way by this terrible epidemic. Either you know of someone who has had cancer or worse yet, you have cancer. For many, this diagnosis is almost a certified death sentence. But, at The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine we believe that it doesn’t have to be this way.

In the mid 90’s, Dr. LaCava was personally touched by cancer when his Father was diagnosed with stomach cancer. In essence, his Father became his first cancer patient. Since then, Dr. LaCava has treated hundreds of cancer patients spanning the spectrum of ages, stages, and types of cancer. Utilizing an Integrative Oncology approach, The LaCava Center utilizes evidence based complementary therapies in concert with traditional medical treatments, in an effort to improve overall efficacy and symptom control, while also working to alleviate patient distress and suffering. 

As a founding member of the International Organization of Integrative Cancer Physicians, Dr. LaCava has helped to pioneer the Integrative Oncology approach to cancer treatment, and further continues his ongoing and evolving education in this field through membership with such groups as Best Answer for Cancer. As an example of our practices ongoing evolution, with passage in Illinois of the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, and the opening of Medical Cannabis dispensaries in November of 2015, Dr. LaCava expanded The LaCava Center’s treatments by utilizing high THC medical cannabis as a therapy to alleviate pain in cancer patients. Moreover, encouraged by the research surrounding Cannabidiol (CBD) and it’s potential as an adjunctive cancer therapy, we have begun to explore its efficacy by utilizing high CBD and low THC strains of medical cannabis. By doing so, we continue to innovate and provide our patients with the very best that integrative and alternative medicine has to offer.

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Mold Exposure

Exposure to mold can be a very serious health concern that is often overlooked in conventional medicine. Mold and fungus produce very toxic chemicals called mycotoxins.

Different species of Mold produce different toxins and people will suffer a wide range of different symptoms. The symptom picture often includes:

  • Brain Fog
  • Depression or Mood Swings
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Skin Sensitivity and Rashes
  • Unexplained allergic sensitivities and immune hypersensitivity
  • Headaches
  • Breathing Problems
  • Memory Loss, short term
  • Chronic Sinusitis, Ear Infections or Bronchitis
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting

Mold Sickness and related illnesses from Mold Exposure are real. Mold has been linked to Lung Damage, Brain Damage, Cancer and even Death. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Journals of American Medicine, all agree that Mold Fine Particulate are dangerous to human health.

We work with Croft Pathology to have your excretion of mycotoxins measured. Testing of your environment may also be warranted to determine the site and degree of exposure. In some cases a tissue biopsy may be necessary, this can be helpful in legal cases.

Upon determination of mycotoxin severity, a treatment protocol will be implemented. This may include, dietary changes, nutritional supplements, pharmaceutical anti-fungals, therapeutic baths and recommendations for your living or work environment.

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Ozone Therapy (Oxidative IV)

Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

To understand Bio-oxidative Medicine it is important to first differentiate the terms Oxygenation and Oxidation. These terms refer to two different metabolic processes that are unrelated.

Oxygenation signifies an increase in the number of oxygen molecules especially as it relates to the uptake and utilization of oxygen at the cellular level. Although Oxygenation therapies can help improve health, they are not part of Bio-oxidative Medicine. However, Oxygenation therapies can be used in conjunction with the therapies used in Bio-oxidative Medicine.

In chemistry, Oxidation is the loss or transfer of electrons from one atom or molecule to another. The opposite of oxidation is reduction in which electrons are gained. Together, this exchange of electrons, called reduction and oxidation, is referred to as redox. All life processes are dependent upon redox. Redox initiates chemical reactions. Life and healing are dependent on a dynamic chemical balance in the body and that chemical balance is dependent on redox. Improving healthy redox is the foundation of Bio-Oxidative Medicine.

As a result of many factors in modern life, such as excess stress, poor nutrition, exposure to radiation and pollution of our air, water and food, the body’s oxidative and antioxidant systems can become overwhelmed. This results in a negative effect on the function of the cells in the body and on the body’s immune system and its ability to defend against infections, allergens, toxins, carcinogens and other stresses of life. Bio-oxidative therapies, like the use of Hydrogen Peroxide Therapy and Ozone Therapy, stimulate the body’s redox systems and help return the body to balance and health.Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

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Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT)

Insulin potentiation therapy (IPT) has been around for a long time. IPT was discovered by Donato Perez Garcia, M.D., and developed by him in Mexico City during the 1930s and 1940s. Following its discovery, its chief practitioners were three generations of the Garcia doctors, who called it cellular therapy or Donatian therapy. In the 1970s or 1980s it was renamed IPT.

IPT (Insulin Potentiation Therapy) is a medical procedure that uses the hormone insulin, followed by glucose, to deliver drugs to the body in smaller doses. The process helps to utilize and concentrate the particular drugs introduced, thus helping to make them more effective, while also helping to reduce possible side effects.

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Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.

Evansville Integrative Medicine

Evansville, Indiana

The City of Evansville, Indiana, was founded in 1812 on a scenic bend in the Ohio River. With a population of nearly 121,000 people in the city limits, and more than 300,000 people in the metropolitan area, Evansville is the third-largest city in Indiana.  Evansville is the social and economic hub for our region, which includes Southwest Indiana, Southeast Illinois and Northwest Kentucky.

Interesting facts about Evansville include:

  • America’s Promise – The Alliance for Youth named us one of the 100 Best Communities for Young People in 2005.
  • The National Civic League recognized Evansville with their prestigious All-America City Award in 2004.
  • The Indiana Chamber of Commerce named Evansville the 2006 Community of the Year.
  • Built in 1915, Evansville’s Bosse Field is the third-oldest professional baseball stadium in the nation behind only Boston’s Fenway Park and Chicago’s Wrigley Field.
    • Scenes from the movie “A League of Their Own,” which starred Geena Davis, Tom Hanks and Madonna, were also filmed at Bosse Field.
  • Some of the sports greats that came from Evansville include Don Mattingly, Don Buse, Bob Griese, Calbert Cheaney, and Walter McCarty.
  • Evansville’s Willard Library opened in 1885 and is the oldest operating library in the State of Indiana. Willard Library is home to one of the most extensive collections for genealogy study in the Midwest and to a famous “Grey Lady” ghost.
  • Fashion designer Halston, whose real name is Roy Halston Frowick, graduated from Evansville’s Bosse High School.
  • The first American soldier to be killed in battle in World War I was an Evansville native, Cpl. James Bethel Gresham of Company F, 16th Infantry, 1st Division, who was killed during a raid near Bathelemont in France on November 3, 1917. He is buried in Evansville’s Locust Hill Cemetery. (source: http://www.evansvillegov.org/Index.aspx?page=115)

Things To Do In Evansville:

Come Spend A Day In Evansville!

Willard Library
With book collections for both adults and children, the Willard Library was founded more than 120 years ago, making it the oldest library in Indiana.

Reitz Home Museum
Celebrating Evansville’s rich past through the historic Victorian Era, the Reitz Home Museum stands to preserve the building and those that surround it. The museum houses early life artifacts, furniture and documents, while the properties carriage house now acts as a museum gift shop.

Mesker Park Zoo & Botanic Garden
Thousands of botanical species, an indoor rainforest exhibit and more than 700 animals await the visitor of the Mesker Park Zoo & Botanic Garden. It also has special programs such as the giraffe feeding and fun in the forest.

Wesselman Woods Nature Preserve
The Wesselman Woods Nature Preserve is a nature preserve and natural landmark populated by old-growth lowland forest. The preserve is a natural habitat for a variety of wildlife, and features a nature center, offering educational exhibits and an observation area.

Angel Mounds State Historic Site
With a museum which tells the story of the Native Americans which lived in the area until 1450, Angel Mounds State Historic Site also has trails for bikers and hikers, which lead to the village.

USS LST Ship Memorial
Dedicated to the men who served on it for more than 50 years, the USS LST Ship Memorial is a floating museum which can be visited thanks to the many volunteers which helped it remain afloat. (source: http://www.tripbuzz.com/free-things-to-do/evansville-in)

Education in Indiana

About Indiana educational system

Evansville is home to several institutions of higher learning. The University of Evansville (UE) is a small, private, Methodist affiliated university with approximately 3,050 students. Founded in 1854, UE features liberal arts and science degrees along with a nationally renowned theatre department. Nearly half of UE’s students study abroad as part of their experience, including at a satellite campus, Harlaxton College, in Grantham, England. UE athletic teams participate in Division I of the NCAA and are known as the Purple Aces. Evansville is a member of the Missouri Valley Conference

The University of Southern Indiana (USI) is a public university located just outside Evansville city limits. Founded in 1965, the school has an enrollment of over 10,800 students and is among the fastest growing comprehensive state universities in Indiana. USI athletic teams participate in Division II of the NCAA and are known as the Screaming Eagles. USI is a member of the Great Lakes Valley Conference.

The Indiana University School of Medicine – Evansville is currently housed on USI’s campus, but there are plans to locate a new interdisciplinary academic health science education and research campus downtown. Other campuses in the city include Ivy Tech Community College, Harrison College, and Oakland City University’s School of Adult and Extended Learning.

Primary and secondary education

Evansville has one unified school system with the county, the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation (EVSC). It consists of five public high schools, 11 middle schools, and 20 elementary schools. In addition there are two parochial, two charter, and one private school. One charter school – Signature School – attracts top tier students and is consistently ranked by a number of publications as one of the top high schools in the United States. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evansville,_Indiana#Education)

History Of Evansville:

Evansville is rich in history!

There was a continuous human presence in the area that became Evansville from at least 8,000 BC by Paleo-Indians. Archaeologists have identified several archaic and ancient sites in and near Evansville, with the most complex at Angel Mounds from about 900 A.D. to about 1600 A.D., just before the appearance of Europeans.

Following the abandonment of Angel Mounds between the years 1400 and 1450, tribes of Miami, Shawnee, Piankeshaw, Wyandot, Delaware and other Native American peoples were known to be in the area. The land encompassing Evansville was formally relinquished by the Delaware in 1805 to General William Henry Harrison, then governor of the Indiana Territory. French hunters and trappers were among the first Europeans to come to the area, using Vincennes as a base of operations.

During World War II, Evansville was a major center of industrial production and, as a result, it helped wipe away the last lingering effects of the Great Depression. A huge 45 acre shipyard complex was constructed on the riverfront east of St. Joseph Avenue for the production of oceangoing LSTs (Landing Ship-Tanks). The Evansville Shipyard was the nation’s largest inland producer of LSTs. The Plymouth factory was converted into a plant which turned out “bullets by the billions,” and many other companies switched over to the manufacture of war material. In 1942 the city acquired a factory adjacent to the airport north of the city for the manufacture of the P-47 Thunderbolt fighter aircraft, known as the P-47Ds. Evansville produced a total 6,242 P-47s, almost half of the P47s made during the war.

After the war, Evansville’s manufacturing base of automobiles, household appliances, and farm equipment benefited from growing post-war demand. A growing housing demand also caused residential development to leap north and east of the city. However, between 1955 and 1963 a nationwide recession hit Evansville particularly hard. Among other closures Servel (which produced refrigerators) went out of business and Chrysler terminated its local operations. The economy was saved from near total collapse by 28 businesses that moved into the area, including Whirlpool, Alcoa, and General Electric.

During the final third of the 20th century, Evansville became the commercial, medical, and service hub for the tri-state region. A 1990s economic spurt was fueled by the growth of the University of Southern Indiana. The arrival of giant Toyota and AK Steel manufacturing plants, as well as Tropicana Evansville, Indiana’s first gaming boat, also contributed to the growth of jobs. As the twenty-first century began, Evansville continued in a steady pace of economic diversification and stability. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evansville,_Indiana#History)

Evansville Neighborhood

Check out Evansville Neighborhood!

Evansville is a larger medium-sized city located in the state of Indiana. With a population of 120,346 people and 48 constituent neighborhoods, Evansville is the third largest community in Indiana.

Unlike some cities where white-collar or blue-collar occupations dominate the local economy, Evansville is neither predominantly one nor the other. Instead, it has a mixed workforce of both white- and blue-collar jobs. Overall, Evansville is a city of sales and office workers, service providers and professionals. There are especially a lot of people living in Evansville who work in office and administrative support (14.44%), sales jobs (11.97%) and food service (7.87%).

In terms of college education, Evansville is nearly on par with the US average for all cities of 21.84%: 18.76% of adults 25 and older in Evansville have a bachelor’s degree or advanced degree.

The per capita income in Evansville in 2010 was $20,951, which is middle income relative to Indiana, and lower middle income relative to the rest of the US. This equates to an annual income of $83,804 for a family of four. However, Evansville contains both very wealthy and poor people as well.

Evansville is a somewhat ethnically-diverse city. The people who call Evansville home describe themselves as belonging to a variety of racial and ethnic groups. The greatest number of Evansville residents report their race to be White, followed by Black or African-American. Important ancestries of people in Evansville include German, Irish, English and French.

The most common language spoken in Evansville is English. Some people also speak Spanish.

POPULAR EVANSVILLE NEIGHBORHOODS

(source: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/in/evansville/)

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Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.