LaCava Center Integrative Medical Highlights

Lyme Disease

Our knowledge of Lyme Disease surfaced in the early 1970s, when a mysterious group of rheumatoid arthritis cases occurred among children in Lyme, Connecticut, and two neighboring towns. Since then we have learned that Lyme Disease has been around for thousands upon thousands of years. It is caused by a corkscrew-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme can affect any organ of the body, including: muscles and joints, the brain and nervous system, and the heart. Lyme is called “The Great Imitator,” because its symptoms mimic many other diseases. Patients with Lyme disease are frequently misdiagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and various psychiatric illnesses, including depression. This has proven true at The LaCava Center where many patients who have been diagnosed with such illnesses, come to us only to find out that Lyme Disease was the culprit all along.

Lyme’s disease is primarily caused by a tick bite. However, it is also believed by many that Horsefly’s, Deer Fly’s, and other insects such as Mosquitoes are transmitters of the disease as well. Unfortunately, many people believe that if they are bitten by a tick that they only need to worry if a red bulls-eye shows up on their skin. Nothing could be further from the truth! It is estimated that only 16% of patients diagnosed with Lyme disease know of a tick bite, and only a third to a half of people have the bulls-eye rash. Furthermore, ticks are hosts to a number of other viruses and parasites including: Heartland Virus, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Babesiosis, Bartonella, and Anaplasmosis. Click here for more.

Although the prevailing logic is that Lyme is an East Coast disease, it is found throughout the United States, as well as in more than sixty other countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. About 1.5 times more than the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times more than the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the US. However, because of Lyme’s nature it often goes undetected leading many experts to believe the true number of cases is much higher.

At The LaCava Center we have noticed Lyme to be a very smart and debilitating disease. We have seen many cases of false negatives in lab testing and even cases where previous treatment proved ineffective resulting in Chronic Lyme. Such cases caused us to search for a lab with the expertise to properly test for Lyme’s existence. After trial and error, we found just such an experiences lab and now partner with it for almost all of our Lyme testing.

If you have suffered from a debilitating disease and have not gotten better, we encourage you to give us a call today. Also please feel free to check out some of the websites below for resources related to Lyme Disease.

www.lymedisease.org

www.cdc.gov

www.ilads.org

www.webmd.com

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Cancer

In 2016, there will be an estimated 1,685,210 new cancer cases diagnosed and 595,690 cancer deaths in the US. Cancer.org. It seems everyone has been touched in some way by this terrible epidemic. Either you know of someone who has had cancer or worse yet, you have cancer. For many, this diagnosis is almost a certified death sentence. But, at The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine we believe that it doesn’t have to be this way.

In the mid 90’s, Dr. LaCava was personally touched by cancer when his Father was diagnosed with stomach cancer. In essence, his Father became his first cancer patient. Since then, Dr. LaCava has treated hundreds of cancer patients spanning the spectrum of ages, stages, and types of cancer. Utilizing an Integrative Oncology approach, The LaCava Center utilizes evidence based complementary therapies in concert with traditional medical treatments, in an effort to improve overall efficacy and symptom control, while also working to alleviate patient distress and suffering. 

As a founding member of the International Organization of Integrative Cancer Physicians, Dr. LaCava has helped to pioneer the Integrative Oncology approach to cancer treatment, and further continues his ongoing and evolving education in this field through membership with such groups as Best Answer for Cancer. As an example of our practices ongoing evolution, with passage in Illinois of the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, and the opening of Medical Cannabis dispensaries in November of 2015, Dr. LaCava expanded The LaCava Center’s treatments by utilizing high THC medical cannabis as a therapy to alleviate pain in cancer patients. Moreover, encouraged by the research surrounding Cannabidiol (CBD) and it’s potential as an adjunctive cancer therapy, we have begun to explore its efficacy by utilizing high CBD and low THC strains of medical cannabis. By doing so, we continue to innovate and provide our patients with the very best that integrative and alternative medicine has to offer.

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Mold Exposure

Exposure to mold can be a very serious health concern that is often overlooked in conventional medicine. Mold and fungus produce very toxic chemicals called mycotoxins.

Different species of Mold produce different toxins and people will suffer a wide range of different symptoms. The symptom picture often includes:

  • Brain Fog
  • Depression or Mood Swings
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Skin Sensitivity and Rashes
  • Unexplained allergic sensitivities and immune hypersensitivity
  • Headaches
  • Breathing Problems
  • Memory Loss, short term
  • Chronic Sinusitis, Ear Infections or Bronchitis
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting

Mold Sickness and related illnesses from Mold Exposure are real. Mold has been linked to Lung Damage, Brain Damage, Cancer and even Death. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Journals of American Medicine, all agree that Mold Fine Particulate are dangerous to human health.

We work with Croft Pathology to have your excretion of mycotoxins measured. Testing of your environment may also be warranted to determine the site and degree of exposure. In some cases a tissue biopsy may be necessary, this can be helpful in legal cases.

Upon determination of mycotoxin severity, a treatment protocol will be implemented. This may include, dietary changes, nutritional supplements, pharmaceutical anti-fungals, therapeutic baths and recommendations for your living or work environment.

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Ozone Therapy (Oxidative IV)

Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

To understand Bio-oxidative Medicine it is important to first differentiate the terms Oxygenation and Oxidation. These terms refer to two different metabolic processes that are unrelated.

Oxygenation signifies an increase in the number of oxygen molecules especially as it relates to the uptake and utilization of oxygen at the cellular level. Although Oxygenation therapies can help improve health, they are not part of Bio-oxidative Medicine. However, Oxygenation therapies can be used in conjunction with the therapies used in Bio-oxidative Medicine.

In chemistry, Oxidation is the loss or transfer of electrons from one atom or molecule to another. The opposite of oxidation is reduction in which electrons are gained. Together, this exchange of electrons, called reduction and oxidation, is referred to as redox. All life processes are dependent upon redox. Redox initiates chemical reactions. Life and healing are dependent on a dynamic chemical balance in the body and that chemical balance is dependent on redox. Improving healthy redox is the foundation of Bio-Oxidative Medicine.

As a result of many factors in modern life, such as excess stress, poor nutrition, exposure to radiation and pollution of our air, water and food, the body’s oxidative and antioxidant systems can become overwhelmed. This results in a negative effect on the function of the cells in the body and on the body’s immune system and its ability to defend against infections, allergens, toxins, carcinogens and other stresses of life. Bio-oxidative therapies, like the use of Hydrogen Peroxide Therapy and Ozone Therapy, stimulate the body’s redox systems and help return the body to balance and health.Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

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Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT)

Insulin potentiation therapy (IPT) has been around for a long time. IPT was discovered by Donato Perez Garcia, M.D., and developed by him in Mexico City during the 1930s and 1940s. Following its discovery, its chief practitioners were three generations of the Garcia doctors, who called it cellular therapy or Donatian therapy. In the 1970s or 1980s it was renamed IPT.

IPT (Insulin Potentiation Therapy) is a medical procedure that uses the hormone insulin, followed by glucose, to deliver drugs to the body in smaller doses. The process helps to utilize and concentrate the particular drugs introduced, thus helping to make them more effective, while also helping to reduce possible side effects.

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Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.

Jacksonville Integrative Medicine

Jacksonville, Florida

Jacksonville, the largest city in area in the continental United States, is a rapidly growing metropolitan city in Northeast Florida, with approximately 850,000 residents. Under its strong mayor form of government, residents elect a mayor and a 19-member City Council, with five at-large members and 14 members elected by district. Lenny Curry is Jacksonville’s 8th mayor since the consolidation of Duval County and City of Jacksonville governments in 1968.

Due to its convenient location, mild climate, reasonable cost of living, high quality of life and a business-friendly government, Jacksonville is a popular location for corporate expansions and relocations. Its status as an intermodal transportation hub is another incentive, and the city is also a leading distribution center, with a transportation network embracing port and air cargo facilities, rail and trucking routes. Millions of tons of raw materials and manufactured goods move through the city annually.

This momentum continues to boost Jacksonville’s stature in the national and international marketplace. In fact, Jacksonville is consistently rated one of the ‘Hottest Cities in America’ for business expansions and relocations in an annual poll featured in Expansion Management magazine.  The U.S. Chamber of Commerce released a study ranking Florida’s Workforce and Training programs number one in the country (Enterprising States Report- 2011), and  Jacksonville was named the nation’s third least expensive city to launch a corporate headquarters (BizCosts.com – 2011).  Jacksonville has garnered an impressive list of top rankings.  (source: http://www.coj.net/about-jacksonville.aspx)

Things To Do In Jacksonville:

Come Spend A Day In Jacksonville!

As the largest city in the continental U.S., Jacksonville is the perfect place to experience a new side of Florida. The abundant waterways, parks and ecological preserves in Jacksonville provide an unforgettable opportunity to escape the ordinary and relax in nature’s playground. All the natural beauty is surrounded by a modern and vibrant city filled with authentic dining options, thrilling attractions, world-class museums, beautiful hotels, exciting events, cool nightlife, a hip Downtown and unique historic districts with entertaining options for visitors of all ages.

Explore all 840 Square Miles
Get to know Jacksonville. Relax on stretches of stunning beaches, paddle through our nature-filled waterways, or experience the downtown renaissance. There’s plenty to do for families, couples, nature-lovers, and golfers.
Bring the running shoes, the yoga pants, and the workout gear, no matter what your level of fitness is or your sport of choice, you can enjoy a great active time in the city of parks–Jacksonville, Florida.

Water Activities and Beaches
Jacksonville is known for its beautiful beaches, including Jacksonville Beach, Neptune Beach, and Atlantic Beach. Learn about visiting our beaches, rivers, and waterways, as well as the best spots for fishing, kayaking, paddle boarding, and surfing.

Family Fun in Jax
Look no further than Jacksonville for the perfect place to connect with family through an ideal Florida family vacation in Jacksonville.

Spectator Sports
Don’t miss the excitement of a Jacksonville Jaguars National Football League home game. In the summer, take the whole family to see the Jacksonville Suns play baseball. From the TaxSlayer Bowl to the Florida-Georgia Football Game, there’s always a game to see in Jax!

Outdoor Activities, Parks & Zoo
Get to know the birds, plants, and animals that inhabit our wild and untouched state parks and nature preserves. Hike, bike, or run on miles of shaded trails or experience the great outdoors with an evening of camping. For an unforgettable wildlife adventure, bring the whole family to one of our many animal related attractions.

Golf In Jacksonville
There’s a reason the PGA Tour and World Golf Hall of Fame are headquartered here. Jacksonville and the surrounding areas boast world-class golf courses for every level of play in beautiful oceanside and riverfront settings. (source: http://www.visitjacksonville.com/things-to-do/)

Education in Jacksonville

About Jacksonville educational system

Colleges and universities

Jacksonville is home to a number of institutions of higher education. The University of North Florida (UNF), opened in 1972, is a public institution and a member of the State University System of Florida. Former mayor John Delaney has been president of UNF since 2003. Jacksonville University (JU) is a private institution founded in 1934. Edward Waters College, established in 1866, is the oldest college in Jacksonville and the state’s oldest historically black college. Florida State College at Jacksonville is a state college and a member of the Florida College System, offering two-year associate’s degrees as well as some four-yearbachelor’s degrees. The University of Florida has its second campus of the J. Hillis Miller Health Science Center in Jacksonville.

Other colleges and universities in Jacksonville include Florida Coastal School of Law and Jones College. Also in the area are St. Johns River State College, a state college with campuses in Clay, St. Johns, andPutnam Counties, and Flagler College in St. Augustine.

Primary and secondary education

Public primary and secondary schools in Jacksonville and Duval County are administered by Duval County Public Schools, which is governed by an elected, seven-member Duval County School Board. In the 2009-2010 school year the district enrolled 123,000 students. It administers 172 total schools, including 103 elementary schools, 25 middle schools, 19 high schools, 3 K-8 schools, and 1 6-12 school, as well as 13charter schools and a juvenile justice school program. Of these, 62 are designated magnet schools.

Three of Jacksonville’s high schools, Stanton College Preparatory School, Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts and Paxon School for Advanced Studies regularly appear at the top of Newsweek magazine’s annual list of the country’s top public high schools, coming in respectively at #3 #7, and #8 in the 2010 edition. Five other schools, Douglas Anderson School of the Arts (#33), Mandarin High School (#97),Duncan U. Fletcher High School (#205) Sandalwood High School (#210), and Englewood High School (#1146) were also included in the list.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of St. Augustine operates a number of Catholic schools in Jacksonville, including two high schools, Bishop Kenny High School and Bishop John J. Snyder High School. Other private schools in Jacksonville include Arlington Country Day School, the Bolles School, Trinity Christian Academy, and the Episcopal School of Jacksonville. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacksonville,_Florida#Education)

History Of Jacksonville:

Jacksonville is rich in history!

The area of the modern city of Jacksonville has been inhabited for thousands of years. On Black Hammock Island in the national Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve, a University of North Florida team discovered some of the oldest remnants of pottery in the United States, dating to 2500 BC. In the 16th century, the beginning of the historical era, the region was inhabited by the Mocama, a coastal subgroup of the Timucuapeople. At the time of contact with Europeans, all Mocama villages in present-day Jacksonville were part of the powerful chiefdom known as the Saturiwa, centered around the mouth of the St. Johns River. One early map shows a village called Ossachite at the site of what is now downtown Jacksonville; this may be the earliest recorded name for that area.

Replica of Jean Ribault’s column claiming Florida forFrance in 1562.

French Huguenot explorer Jean Ribault charted the St. Johns River in 1562 calling it the River of May because he discovered it in May. Ribault erected a stone column near present-day Jacksonville claiming the newly discovered land for France. In 1564, René Goulaine de Laudonnière established the first European settlement, Fort Caroline, on the St. Johns near the main village of the Saturiwa. Philip II of Spain ordered Pedro Menéndez de Avilés to protect the interest of Spain by attacking the French presence at Fort Caroline. On September 20, 1565, a Spanish force from the nearby Spanish settlement of St. Augustine attacked Fort Caroline, and killed nearly all the French soldiers defending it. The Spanish renamed the fort San Mateo, and following the ejection of the French, St. Augustine’s position as the most important settlement in Florida was solidified. The location of Fort Caroline is subject to debate but a reconstruction of the fort was established on the St. Johns River in 1964.

Spain ceded Florida to the British in 1763 after the French and Indian War, and the British soon constructed the King’s Road connecting St. Augustine to Georgia. The road crossed the St. Johns River at a narrow point, which the Seminole called Wacca Pilatka and the British called the Cow Ford; these names ostensibly reflect the fact that cattle were brought across the river there. The British introduced the cultivation of sugar cane, indigo and fruits as well the export of lumber. As a result, the northeastern Florida area prospered economically more than it had under the Spanish. Britain ceded control of the territory back to Spain in 1783, after its defeat in the American Revolutionary War, and the settlement at the Cow Ford continued to grow. After Spain ceded the Florida Territory to the United States in 1821, American settlers on the north side of the Cow Ford decided to plan a town, laying out the streets and plats. They soon named the town Jacksonville, after Andrew Jackson. Led by Isaiah D. Hart, residents wrote a charter for a town government, which was approved by the Florida Legislative Council on February 9, 1832. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacksonville,_Florida#History)

Jacksonville Neighborhood

Check out Jacksonville Neighborhood!

Jacksonville is a very large coastal city (i.e. on the ocean, a bay, or inlet) located in the state of Florida. With a population of 853,382 people and 162 constituent neighborhoods, Jacksonville is the largest community in Florida.

Jacksonville is neither predominantly blue-collar nor white-collar, instead having a mixed workforce of both blue-collar and white-collar jobs. Overall, Jacksonville is a city of sales and office workers, professionals and service providers. There are especially a lot of people living in Jacksonville who work in office and administrative support (17.22%), sales jobs (11.18%) and management occupations (8.99%).

Also of interest is that Jacksonville has more people living here who work in computers and math than 95% of the places in the US.

One thing noticeable about Jacksonville, is that it has a large population of people who are young, single, educated, and upwardly-mobile career starters. That’s because Jacksonville is full of single people in their 20s and 30s and who have undergraduate or graduate degrees and are starting careers in professional occupations. This makes Jacksonville a great place for young, educated career starters looking to find many people like themselves, with good opportunities for friendships, socializing, romance, and fun. In fact, Jacksonville is one of the top larger cities in America for educated single professionals to flock.

Jacksonville is also nautical, which means that parts of it are somewhat historic and touch the ocean or tidal bodies of water, such as inlets and bays. Quite often, nautical areas such as these attract visitors and locals who come to enjoy the scenery and various waterfront activities.

Jacksonville is one of the most car-oriented large cities in America. A full 84.34% of people drive their car alone to work each day. If you like to drive, you’ll love it. And you better. Because walking to work is just not a viable option for most people who live in Jacksonville. Highways, wide streets, parking lots, and shopping centers are part of the common Jacksonville landscape.

Jacksonville is an extremely ethnically-diverse city. The people who call Jacksonville home describe themselves as belonging to a variety of racial and ethnic groups. The greatest number of Jacksonville residents report their race to be White, followed by Black or African-American. Important ancestries of people in Jacksonville include Irish, German, English, Italian and French. (source: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/fl/jacksonville/)

Reach Out For More Info!

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Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.