LaCava Center Integrative Medical Highlights

Lyme Disease

Our knowledge of Lyme Disease surfaced in the early 1970s, when a mysterious group of rheumatoid arthritis cases occurred among children in Lyme, Connecticut, and two neighboring towns. Since then we have learned that Lyme Disease has been around for thousands upon thousands of years. It is caused by a corkscrew-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme can affect any organ of the body, including: muscles and joints, the brain and nervous system, and the heart. Lyme is called “The Great Imitator,” because its symptoms mimic many other diseases. Patients with Lyme disease are frequently misdiagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and various psychiatric illnesses, including depression. This has proven true at The LaCava Center where many patients who have been diagnosed with such illnesses, come to us only to find out that Lyme Disease was the culprit all along.

Lyme’s disease is primarily caused by a tick bite. However, it is also believed by many that Horsefly’s, Deer Fly’s, and other insects such as Mosquitoes are transmitters of the disease as well. Unfortunately, many people believe that if they are bitten by a tick that they only need to worry if a red bulls-eye shows up on their skin. Nothing could be further from the truth! It is estimated that only 16% of patients diagnosed with Lyme disease know of a tick bite, and only a third to a half of people have the bulls-eye rash. Furthermore, ticks are hosts to a number of other viruses and parasites including: Heartland Virus, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Babesiosis, Bartonella, and Anaplasmosis. Click here for more.

Although the prevailing logic is that Lyme is an East Coast disease, it is found throughout the United States, as well as in more than sixty other countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. About 1.5 times more than the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times more than the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the US. However, because of Lyme’s nature it often goes undetected leading many experts to believe the true number of cases is much higher.

At The LaCava Center we have noticed Lyme to be a very smart and debilitating disease. We have seen many cases of false negatives in lab testing and even cases where previous treatment proved ineffective resulting in Chronic Lyme. Such cases caused us to search for a lab with the expertise to properly test for Lyme’s existence. After trial and error, we found just such an experiences lab and now partner with it for almost all of our Lyme testing.

If you have suffered from a debilitating disease and have not gotten better, we encourage you to give us a call today. Also please feel free to check out some of the websites below for resources related to Lyme Disease.

www.lymedisease.org

www.cdc.gov

www.ilads.org

www.webmd.com

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Cancer

In 2016, there will be an estimated 1,685,210 new cancer cases diagnosed and 595,690 cancer deaths in the US. Cancer.org. It seems everyone has been touched in some way by this terrible epidemic. Either you know of someone who has had cancer or worse yet, you have cancer. For many, this diagnosis is almost a certified death sentence. But, at The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine we believe that it doesn’t have to be this way.

In the mid 90’s, Dr. LaCava was personally touched by cancer when his Father was diagnosed with stomach cancer. In essence, his Father became his first cancer patient. Since then, Dr. LaCava has treated hundreds of cancer patients spanning the spectrum of ages, stages, and types of cancer. Utilizing an Integrative Oncology approach, The LaCava Center utilizes evidence based complementary therapies in concert with traditional medical treatments, in an effort to improve overall efficacy and symptom control, while also working to alleviate patient distress and suffering. 

As a founding member of the International Organization of Integrative Cancer Physicians, Dr. LaCava has helped to pioneer the Integrative Oncology approach to cancer treatment, and further continues his ongoing and evolving education in this field through membership with such groups as Best Answer for Cancer. As an example of our practices ongoing evolution, with passage in Illinois of the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, and the opening of Medical Cannabis dispensaries in November of 2015, Dr. LaCava expanded The LaCava Center’s treatments by utilizing high THC medical cannabis as a therapy to alleviate pain in cancer patients. Moreover, encouraged by the research surrounding Cannabidiol (CBD) and it’s potential as an adjunctive cancer therapy, we have begun to explore its efficacy by utilizing high CBD and low THC strains of medical cannabis. By doing so, we continue to innovate and provide our patients with the very best that integrative and alternative medicine has to offer.

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Mold Exposure

Exposure to mold can be a very serious health concern that is often overlooked in conventional medicine. Mold and fungus produce very toxic chemicals called mycotoxins.

Different species of Mold produce different toxins and people will suffer a wide range of different symptoms. The symptom picture often includes:

  • Brain Fog
  • Depression or Mood Swings
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Skin Sensitivity and Rashes
  • Unexplained allergic sensitivities and immune hypersensitivity
  • Headaches
  • Breathing Problems
  • Memory Loss, short term
  • Chronic Sinusitis, Ear Infections or Bronchitis
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting

Mold Sickness and related illnesses from Mold Exposure are real. Mold has been linked to Lung Damage, Brain Damage, Cancer and even Death. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Journals of American Medicine, all agree that Mold Fine Particulate are dangerous to human health.

We work with Croft Pathology to have your excretion of mycotoxins measured. Testing of your environment may also be warranted to determine the site and degree of exposure. In some cases a tissue biopsy may be necessary, this can be helpful in legal cases.

Upon determination of mycotoxin severity, a treatment protocol will be implemented. This may include, dietary changes, nutritional supplements, pharmaceutical anti-fungals, therapeutic baths and recommendations for your living or work environment.

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Ozone Therapy (Oxidative IV)

Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

To understand Bio-oxidative Medicine it is important to first differentiate the terms Oxygenation and Oxidation. These terms refer to two different metabolic processes that are unrelated.

Oxygenation signifies an increase in the number of oxygen molecules especially as it relates to the uptake and utilization of oxygen at the cellular level. Although Oxygenation therapies can help improve health, they are not part of Bio-oxidative Medicine. However, Oxygenation therapies can be used in conjunction with the therapies used in Bio-oxidative Medicine.

In chemistry, Oxidation is the loss or transfer of electrons from one atom or molecule to another. The opposite of oxidation is reduction in which electrons are gained. Together, this exchange of electrons, called reduction and oxidation, is referred to as redox. All life processes are dependent upon redox. Redox initiates chemical reactions. Life and healing are dependent on a dynamic chemical balance in the body and that chemical balance is dependent on redox. Improving healthy redox is the foundation of Bio-Oxidative Medicine.

As a result of many factors in modern life, such as excess stress, poor nutrition, exposure to radiation and pollution of our air, water and food, the body’s oxidative and antioxidant systems can become overwhelmed. This results in a negative effect on the function of the cells in the body and on the body’s immune system and its ability to defend against infections, allergens, toxins, carcinogens and other stresses of life. Bio-oxidative therapies, like the use of Hydrogen Peroxide Therapy and Ozone Therapy, stimulate the body’s redox systems and help return the body to balance and health.Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

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Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT)

Insulin potentiation therapy (IPT) has been around for a long time. IPT was discovered by Donato Perez Garcia, M.D., and developed by him in Mexico City during the 1930s and 1940s. Following its discovery, its chief practitioners were three generations of the Garcia doctors, who called it cellular therapy or Donatian therapy. In the 1970s or 1980s it was renamed IPT.

IPT (Insulin Potentiation Therapy) is a medical procedure that uses the hormone insulin, followed by glucose, to deliver drugs to the body in smaller doses. The process helps to utilize and concentrate the particular drugs introduced, thus helping to make them more effective, while also helping to reduce possible side effects.

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Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.

Milwaukee Integrative Medicine

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Wisconsin’s largest city, urban-easy Milwaukee is a great city on a Great Lake! While still celebrating our beer brewing heritage, the city now has a powerhouse arts scene, big-city attractions, revitalized historic districts, numerous James Beard-nominated chefs and a vibrant farm-to-table culinary scene.

This combination of cherished tradition and modern attitude is reflected in our architecture and in a variety of walk-around, character-filled neighborhoods. Known as the “City of Festivals,” Milwaukee is home to thirty summer festivals, including Summerfest, the world’s largest music festival which spans 11 days, 11 stages and routinely welcomes more than 800,000 music fans to town. Explore one-of-a-kind attractions like the Milwaukee Art Museum, Miller Park, the world’s only Harley-Davidson Museum and Potawatomi Hotel & Casino and experience our brewing heritage on brewery tours offered by MillerCoors and local microbreweries like Lakefront Brewery, Milwaukee Brewing Company and Sprecher (also a great option for kids thanks to their world-class craft sodas!). Excursion boats and kayaks beckon one to the Milwaukee River and Lake Michigan, getting you out on the water.

Milwaukee is a fun and easy getaway, whether your vacation plans include fine diningcraft cocktailsfamily fun or outdoor adventure! (source: http://www.travelwisconsin.com/southeast/milwaukee-county/milwaukee)

Things To Do In Milwaukee:

Come Spend A Day In Milwaukee!

As much fun as it is to explore a city on your own, there are a lot of great spots a visitor might miss without a trusty guide! In Milwaukee, you’ll find tours for foodies, adventurers and those who just want to sit back and see the city from a new perspective.

FESTIVALS & MAJOR EVENTS
They call Milwaukee the “City of Festivals,” and it only takes a glance at the calendar to know why! With great street festivals and special events all year, plus near-weekly ethnic festivals and huge events like Summerfest and the Wisconsin State Fair in the summer, there’s always a party going on in Milwaukee – and you’re invited! (source: http://visitmilwaukee.org/tours)

Welcome to four seasons of exploring, adventuring, and enjoying all there is to do in Wisconsin. Who knew Wisconsin was a premier destination for lighthouses, waterfalls, caves, world class fishing, re-living (and making) history, professional sports, and the arts at their finest. Here in Wisconsin we have a knack for balancing the traditional with the cutting-edge, always seeking and finding new ways to have fun.

CHEQUAMEGON-NICOLET NAT’L FOREST-LAKEWOOD
The Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest covers more than 1.5 million acres of Wisconsin’s Northwoods. The Chequamegon side of the forest covers about 858,400 acres in Ashland, Bayfield, Sawyer, Price, Taylor and Vilas counties while the Nicolet side covers nearly 661,400 acres in Florence, Forest, Langlade, Oconto, Oneida and Vilas counties.

LAKE GENEVA CANOPY TOURS
Lake Geneva Canopy Tours has an Eco Adventure for everyone! Explore our expansive 100 acres, year-round, at your pace. For the ultimate thrill, traverse 8 different zip lines, 5 sky bridges, 3 spiral stairways and climb a one-of-a-kind “floating” double helix stairway while on our world class Canopy Tour.

TALIESIN – FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT VISITOR CENTER
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin Estate is truly among the world’s treasures. It is a 700-acre National Historic Landmark – home to six Wright-designed structures. A variety of tours are offered daily, May – October, and weekends in April and November, to fit each visitor’s level of interest and familiarity.

OLD WORLD WISCONSIN
Old World Wisconsin exhibits the lifestyles, ethnic traditions and challenges of 19th-century European immigrants, Yankee settlers and African Americans who settled in Wisconsin. The museum’s historic buildings, gathered from throughout the state, stand restored to their original condition. (source: http://www.travelwisconsin.com/things-to-do)

Education in Milwaukee

About Milwaukee educational system

Primary and secondary education

Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS) is the largest school district in Wisconsin and thirty third in the nation. As of 2007, it had an enrollment of 89,912 students and as of 2006 employed 11,100 full-time and substitute teachers in 323 schools. Milwaukee Public Schools operate as magnet schools, with individualized specialty areas for interests in academics or the arts. Washington High School, Riverside University High School, Rufus King High School, Ronald Wilson Reagan College Preparatory High School, Samuel Morse Middle School for the Gifted and Talented, Golda Meir School, Milwaukee High School of the Arts, and Lynde & Harry Bradley Technology and Trade School are some of the magnet schools in Milwaukee. In 2007, 17 MPS high schools appeared on a national list of “dropout factories” – schools where fewer than 60% of freshmen graduate on time. Milwaukee is also home to over two dozen private or parochial high schools (e.g., St. Anthony High School, Divine Savior Holy Angels High School, Thomas More High School, Dominican High School, Messmer High School, Marquette University High School, Milwaukee Lutheran High School, Pius XI High School, St. Joan Antida High School, andUniversity School of Milwaukee among others) and many private and parochial middle and elementary schools.

Of persons in Milwaukee aged 25 and above, 84.5% have a high school diploma, and 27% have a bachelor’s degree or higher. (2000)

Higher education

In 2000, Milwaukee ranked 6th among the 30 largest North American cities in number of college students per capita.

Milwaukee area universities and colleges:

  • Alverno College
  • The Art Institute of Wisconsin
  • Bryant and Stratton
  • Cardinal Stritch University
  • Herzing University
  • Marquette University
  • Medical College of Wisconsin (Wauwatosa)
  • Milwaukee Area Technical College
  • Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design
  • Milwaukee School of Engineering
  • Mount Mary College
  • National-Louis University
  • University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee
  • Wisconsin Lutheran College

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milwaukee#Education)

History Of Milwaukee:

Milwaukee is rich in history!

In 1892, Whitefish Bay, South Milwaukee, and Wauwatosa were incorporated. They were followed by Cudahy (1895), North Milwaukee (1897) and East Milwaukee, later known as Shorewood, in 1900. In the early 20th century West Allis (1902), and West Milwaukee (1906) were added, which completed the first generation of “inner-ring” suburbs.

In the 1920s Chicago gangster activity came north to Milwaukee during the Prohibition era. Al Capone, noted Chicago mobster, owned a home in the Milwaukee suburb Brookfield, where moonshine was made. The house still stands on a street named after Capone.

By 1960, Milwaukee had grown to become one of the largest cities in the United States. Its population peaked at 741,324. In 1960, the Census Bureau reported city’s population as 8.4% black and 91.1% white.

By the late 1960s, Milwaukee’s population had started to decline due to white flight[29] Milwaukee had a population of 636,212 by 1980, while the population of the metropolitan area increased. Milwaukee avoided the severe declines of its fellow “rust belt” cities due to its large immigrant population and historic neighborhoods.

Since the 1980s, the city has begun to make strides in improving its economy, neighborhoods, and image, resulting in the revitalization of neighborhoods such as the Historic Third Ward, Lincoln Village, the East Side, and more recently Walker’s Point and Bay View, along with attracting new businesses to its downtown area. These efforts have substantially slowed the population decline and has stabilized many parts of Milwaukee.

Milwaukee’s European history is evident today. Largely through its efforts to preserve its history, in 2006 Milwaukee was named one of the “Dozen Distinctive Destinations” by theNational Trust for Historic Preservation.

In 2010, the Census Bureau released revised population numbers for Milwaukee that showed the city gained population, growing by 1.3%, between 2000 and 2009. This was the first population increase the city of Milwaukee has seen since the 1960 census.

Historic Milwaukee walking tours provide a guided tour of Milwaukee’s historic districts, including topics on Milwaukee’s architectural heritage, its glass skywalk system, and theMilwaukee Riverwalk. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milwaukee#History)

Milwaukee Neighborhood

Check out Milwaukee Neighborhood!

Milwaukee is a very large city located in the state of Wisconsin. With a population of 599,642 people and 210 constituent neighborhoods, Milwaukee is the largest community in Wisconsin.

Unlike some cities, Milwaukee isn’t mainly white- or blue-collar. Instead, the most prevalent occupations for people in Milwaukee are a mix of both white- and blue-collar jobs. Overall, Milwaukee is a city of service providers, sales and office workers and professionals. There are especially a lot of people living in Milwaukee who work in office and administrative support (14.20%), sales jobs (8.79%) and food service (7.81%).

Milwaukee is one of the most attractive larger cities for people who are young, single, educated, and upwardly-mobile career starters. This makes it a good place to live for young singles in their 20s and 30s and who have undergraduate or graduate degrees and are starting their professional careers. Although Milwaukee is a large city, this demographic is significant enough that young professionals will find many others like themselves here, with really good opportunities for friendships, recreation, romance, and more.

Milwaukee, like many big cities in America, has a public transportation system, but the citizens of Milwaukee are lucky because theirs is one of the most extensive and widely used. Many commuters choose to leave their cars at home and instead use the bus to get to and from work. In fact, for some people it is feasible to forgo car ownership entirely, avoiding the cost and headache of driving in heavy traffic. The benefits include reduced air pollution and load on the road network.

Milwaukee is an extremely ethnically-diverse city. The people who call Milwaukee home describe themselves as belonging to a variety of racial and ethnic groups. The greatest number of Milwaukee residents report their race to be White, followed by Black or African-American. Milwaukee also has a sizeable Hispanic population (people of Hispanic origin can be of any race). People of Hispanic or Latino origin account for 17.74% of the city’s residents. Important ancestries of people in Milwaukee include German, Polish, Irish, Italian and English.(source: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/wi/milwaukee/)

Reach Out For More Info!

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your Phone (required)

Your Message

Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.