LaCava Center Integrative Medical Highlights

Lyme Disease

Our knowledge of Lyme Disease surfaced in the early 1970s, when a mysterious group of rheumatoid arthritis cases occurred among children in Lyme, Connecticut, and two neighboring towns. Since then we have learned that Lyme Disease has been around for thousands upon thousands of years. It is caused by a corkscrew-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme can affect any organ of the body, including: muscles and joints, the brain and nervous system, and the heart. Lyme is called “The Great Imitator,” because its symptoms mimic many other diseases. Patients with Lyme disease are frequently misdiagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and various psychiatric illnesses, including depression. This has proven true at The LaCava Center where many patients who have been diagnosed with such illnesses, come to us only to find out that Lyme Disease was the culprit all along.

Lyme’s disease is primarily caused by a tick bite. However, it is also believed by many that Horsefly’s, Deer Fly’s, and other insects such as Mosquitoes are transmitters of the disease as well. Unfortunately, many people believe that if they are bitten by a tick that they only need to worry if a red bulls-eye shows up on their skin. Nothing could be further from the truth! It is estimated that only 16% of patients diagnosed with Lyme disease know of a tick bite, and only a third to a half of people have the bulls-eye rash. Furthermore, ticks are hosts to a number of other viruses and parasites including: Heartland Virus, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Babesiosis, Bartonella, and Anaplasmosis. Click here for more.

Although the prevailing logic is that Lyme is an East Coast disease, it is found throughout the United States, as well as in more than sixty other countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. About 1.5 times more than the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times more than the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the US. However, because of Lyme’s nature it often goes undetected leading many experts to believe the true number of cases is much higher.

At The LaCava Center we have noticed Lyme to be a very smart and debilitating disease. We have seen many cases of false negatives in lab testing and even cases where previous treatment proved ineffective resulting in Chronic Lyme. Such cases caused us to search for a lab with the expertise to properly test for Lyme’s existence. After trial and error, we found just such an experiences lab and now partner with it for almost all of our Lyme testing.

If you have suffered from a debilitating disease and have not gotten better, we encourage you to give us a call today. Also please feel free to check out some of the websites below for resources related to Lyme Disease.

www.lymedisease.org

www.cdc.gov

www.ilads.org

www.webmd.com

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Cancer

In 2016, there will be an estimated 1,685,210 new cancer cases diagnosed and 595,690 cancer deaths in the US. Cancer.org. It seems everyone has been touched in some way by this terrible epidemic. Either you know of someone who has had cancer or worse yet, you have cancer. For many, this diagnosis is almost a certified death sentence. But, at The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine we believe that it doesn’t have to be this way.

In the mid 90’s, Dr. LaCava was personally touched by cancer when his Father was diagnosed with stomach cancer. In essence, his Father became his first cancer patient. Since then, Dr. LaCava has treated hundreds of cancer patients spanning the spectrum of ages, stages, and types of cancer. Utilizing an Integrative Oncology approach, The LaCava Center utilizes evidence based complementary therapies in concert with traditional medical treatments, in an effort to improve overall efficacy and symptom control, while also working to alleviate patient distress and suffering. 

As a founding member of the International Organization of Integrative Cancer Physicians, Dr. LaCava has helped to pioneer the Integrative Oncology approach to cancer treatment, and further continues his ongoing and evolving education in this field through membership with such groups as Best Answer for Cancer. As an example of our practices ongoing evolution, with passage in Illinois of the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, and the opening of Medical Cannabis dispensaries in November of 2015, Dr. LaCava expanded The LaCava Center’s treatments by utilizing high THC medical cannabis as a therapy to alleviate pain in cancer patients. Moreover, encouraged by the research surrounding Cannabidiol (CBD) and it’s potential as an adjunctive cancer therapy, we have begun to explore its efficacy by utilizing high CBD and low THC strains of medical cannabis. By doing so, we continue to innovate and provide our patients with the very best that integrative and alternative medicine has to offer.

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Mold Exposure

Exposure to mold can be a very serious health concern that is often overlooked in conventional medicine. Mold and fungus produce very toxic chemicals called mycotoxins.

Different species of Mold produce different toxins and people will suffer a wide range of different symptoms. The symptom picture often includes:

  • Brain Fog
  • Depression or Mood Swings
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Skin Sensitivity and Rashes
  • Unexplained allergic sensitivities and immune hypersensitivity
  • Headaches
  • Breathing Problems
  • Memory Loss, short term
  • Chronic Sinusitis, Ear Infections or Bronchitis
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting

Mold Sickness and related illnesses from Mold Exposure are real. Mold has been linked to Lung Damage, Brain Damage, Cancer and even Death. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Journals of American Medicine, all agree that Mold Fine Particulate are dangerous to human health.

We work with Croft Pathology to have your excretion of mycotoxins measured. Testing of your environment may also be warranted to determine the site and degree of exposure. In some cases a tissue biopsy may be necessary, this can be helpful in legal cases.

Upon determination of mycotoxin severity, a treatment protocol will be implemented. This may include, dietary changes, nutritional supplements, pharmaceutical anti-fungals, therapeutic baths and recommendations for your living or work environment.

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Ozone Therapy (Oxidative IV)

Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

To understand Bio-oxidative Medicine it is important to first differentiate the terms Oxygenation and Oxidation. These terms refer to two different metabolic processes that are unrelated.

Oxygenation signifies an increase in the number of oxygen molecules especially as it relates to the uptake and utilization of oxygen at the cellular level. Although Oxygenation therapies can help improve health, they are not part of Bio-oxidative Medicine. However, Oxygenation therapies can be used in conjunction with the therapies used in Bio-oxidative Medicine.

In chemistry, Oxidation is the loss or transfer of electrons from one atom or molecule to another. The opposite of oxidation is reduction in which electrons are gained. Together, this exchange of electrons, called reduction and oxidation, is referred to as redox. All life processes are dependent upon redox. Redox initiates chemical reactions. Life and healing are dependent on a dynamic chemical balance in the body and that chemical balance is dependent on redox. Improving healthy redox is the foundation of Bio-Oxidative Medicine.

As a result of many factors in modern life, such as excess stress, poor nutrition, exposure to radiation and pollution of our air, water and food, the body’s oxidative and antioxidant systems can become overwhelmed. This results in a negative effect on the function of the cells in the body and on the body’s immune system and its ability to defend against infections, allergens, toxins, carcinogens and other stresses of life. Bio-oxidative therapies, like the use of Hydrogen Peroxide Therapy and Ozone Therapy, stimulate the body’s redox systems and help return the body to balance and health.Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

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Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT)

Insulin potentiation therapy (IPT) has been around for a long time. IPT was discovered by Donato Perez Garcia, M.D., and developed by him in Mexico City during the 1930s and 1940s. Following its discovery, its chief practitioners were three generations of the Garcia doctors, who called it cellular therapy or Donatian therapy. In the 1970s or 1980s it was renamed IPT.

IPT (Insulin Potentiation Therapy) is a medical procedure that uses the hormone insulin, followed by glucose, to deliver drugs to the body in smaller doses. The process helps to utilize and concentrate the particular drugs introduced, thus helping to make them more effective, while also helping to reduce possible side effects.

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Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.

Normal Integrative Medicine

Normal, Illinois

Normal is an incorporated town in McLean County, Illinois, United States. It had a population of 52,497 as of the 2010 census. Normal is the smaller of two principal municipalities of the Bloomington-Normal metropolitan area. Normal is the seventh-most populous community in Illinois, outside of the Chicago Metropolitan Area.

Originally known as North Bloomington, the town was given the name of Normal in February 1865 and officially incorporated in 1867. The name was taken from Illinois State Normal University, a normal school (teacher-training institution) located there. The school has since been renamed Illinois State University after becoming a general four year university. Normal is adjacent to Bloomington, Illinois, and when mentioned together they are known as the “Twin Cities”, “Bloomington-Normal”, “B-N”, or “Blo-No.” The mayor of Normal is Chris Koos.

The main campus of Illinois’ oldest public university, Illinois State University, a fully accredited four-year institution, is located in Normal, as is Heartland Community College, a fully accredited two-year institution. There is also a satellite campus of Lincoln College, which offers associate degrees as well as four-year programs. (source: https://www.mapquest.com/us/il/normal-282028316)

Things To Do In Normal:

Come Spend A Day In Normal!

Recreation and entertainment

  • The Children’s Discovery Museum in uptown Normal provides hands-on exhibits, classes and programs for children. The museum has three floors of exhibits including a two-story mesh climber for children to climb to the third floor and a 2,000-square-foot (190 m2) agriculture exhibit called AgMazing. The museum also offers education programs and houses the Discover More! Store. In 2010, the Children’s Discovery Museum was deemed the best creative children’s experience in Illinois by Media World USA’s “Best of” Series. The Children’s Discovery Museum was subsequently featured on a Best of Illinois television program on CBS 2 WBBM Chicago and on the Travel Channel.
  • The Illinois State University Planetarium offers a variety of science and astronomy programs for children from preschool to high-school. The planetarium is located in Felmley Hall of Science on ISU’s campus. Public programs are usually offered on weekends and during special events.
  • The Challenger Learning Center relocated to Heartland Community College in 2010. The Challenger Learning Center promotes leadership, communication, problem-solving and critical thinking skills while offering an interactive, simulated space and science experience through scheduled team missions for students, public and corporate groups

Golfing
In 2005, Golf Digest ranked Bloomington-Normal as the Fifth Best American City for Golf in their “Best in America” Metro Golf Rankings. Golf Digest ranked America’s largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas on four different criteria: access to golf, weather, value of golf, and quality of golf.

Nature and wildlife

  • Normal offers many parks and facilities. As of February 2011, there are 24 parks, facilities and trails operated by the Town of Normal: Carden Park, Children and Elders Forest, Children’s Discovery Museum, Connie Link Amphitheater, Constitution Trail, David S. Anderson Park, East Detention Basin, Fairview Park, Fell Park, Fransen Park, Hidden Creek Nature Sanctuary, Ironwood Golf Course, Ironwood Park, Kelly Detention Basin, Martin Luther King Jr. Park, Maxwell Park, Normal Theater, Oak Street Ball Diamond, One Normal Plaza & Community Activity Center, Rosa Park Commons, Savannah Park, Shepard Park, Underwood Park, and the West Detention Basin. Fairview and David S. Anderson parks include swimming pools; Fairview Park includes a skate park for in-line skating and skateboarding; Carden Park includes “Safety Town”, a place for pre-school aged children to “drive” tricycles complete with traffic signs; and Maxwell Park has a fenced-in dog park and Champion Fields.
  • The Bloomington-Normal Constitution Trail is a 24-mile (39 km) jogging, walking, cycling, and rollerblading trail has become a hit with the community. The north-south segment of the trail follows the abandoned Illinois Central Gulf (ICG) railroad from Kerrick Road in Normal to Bell Street in Bloomington. The east-west segment intersects the north segment at Normal City Hall Annex and continues east to Towanda-Barnes Road. The Liberty Branch begins at Commerce Drive and ends at Old Farm Lakes Subdivision. The Freedom Branch begins at Lincoln Street and ends at Route 9 West. Parking is available at adjoining lots throughout the area. The trail is open to walkers, runners, in-line skaters, skateboarders, cyclists, wheelchair users, and other non-motorized forms of transportation. During winter months, it is not cleared of snow, and is available to skiers; weather permitting.
  • The Ecology Action Center is a walk-in information and environmental education center for individuals, classes, workshops, and meetings. Opened in 1995, it provides the community with practical workshops on recycling, composting and energy saving, nature walks and educational field trips for schools and groups. Various publications and materials are available.

Historic Sites

  • the Illinois Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Children’s School, operated from 1865 until 1979, when it was officially closed. The reasons for closure included a rising high per capita cost of care, the deterioration of many campus buildings, and dwindling numbers of children referred by state agencies. Though several of the original structures have been abandoned and left derelict, others have been converted for a number of uses. These include a seniors community, a commercial pool providing swim lessons, and a community football field. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normal,_Illinois#Attractions)

Education in Normal

About Normal educational system

There are also two schools in Normal that are operated by Illinois State University. They are:

Private schools

  • Cornerstone Christian Academy, a Christian preschool through 12th grade school on the SE side of the area.
  • Epiphany Catholic School, a Roman Catholic primary and middle school, is in Normal.
  • Calvary Christian Academy, a Christian pre-K through 12th grade school in Normal.

Colleges and universities

Normal is also home to three centers of higher learning.

  • Illinois State University, founded in 1857, was the first public university in the state, and is one of the Midwest’s oldest institutions of higher education. It is a co-educational, residential university with an emphasis on the undergraduate program, offering more than 160 fields of undergraduate study. The Graduate School coordinates 38 masters, two specialist and seven doctoral programs. The 350-acre (1.4 km2) campus includes over 60 major buildings with state-of-the-art technology. Watterson Towers is one of the tallest dorm buildings in the world. From meeting facilities to cultural opportunities through the arts and excitement of numerous sporting events each year, ISU is a vital part of the Bloomington-Normal community.
Watterson Towers, 2004
  • Heartland Community College has more than 4,800 students, and is the youngest community college in Illinois. Heartland Community College offers training in more than 40 career fields in innovative and technologically progressive leaning facilities. Classrooms and labs combine the latest advances in technology with the type of personal, hands-on instruction students need to reach their academic goals. The HCC Campus features a library, community meeting spaces, a pond, bookstore, café and numerous locations for students to study or work on school projects. Recently, Heartland completed a new Corporate Education Center and founded an athletic program that includes baseball, softball and men’s and women’s soccer teams.
  • Lincoln College, Illinois, a private residential college, offers academic, vocational, and accelerated degree programs to nearly 600 students. Accredited by the North Central Association, Lincoln offers bachelor’s degrees in Business Management, Liberal Arts, Criminal Justice and Tourism, Sports and Hospitality Management, as well as associate degrees. Courses are offered at convenient and flexible times in a small classroom environment with a student/faculty ratio of 14 to 1. A student activity center and fully furnished apartment suite housing is available on campus.

Trade schools

  • Paul Mitchell The School was designed to teach students skills they will need, inspire them to explore their passion and creativity, and help them learn the business that will make their career in the beauty industry fun and rewarding.
  • Midwest College of Cosmetology provides professional training courses in cosmetology, nails, massage therapy, instructor training, skin care and hair removal. The program also includes professional rules and regulations, anatomy and physiology, salon business management, customer relations, and marketing.
  • Bloomington-Normal School of Radiography

Weekend education

Bloomington/Normal Japanese Saturday School a Japanese weekend school, was established in 1986 and held at the Thomas Metcalf School. It has a separate office in Normal. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normal,_Illinois#Education)

History Of Normal:

Normal is rich in history!

Founding: A Normal Birth
In 1854, the town of North Bloomington was platted in the area commonly known as “The Junction,” located at the intersection of the Illinois Central and the Chicago and Alton railroads. At the time, the town consisted of all real estate bound between North Street to the north, South Street (now Florence) to the south, Elm Street (now Fell) to the west, and Chicago Street (now Linden) to the east. This parcel of land belonged to Joseph Parkinson, after whom Parkinson Street was named.

Jesse Fell
The first addition to the new town was developed by Jesse Fell in 1857 and lay north and east of the original plat. Although Jesse Fell is referred to as the founding father of Normal, he was not involved in the original layout of the town, but he soon became a central figure in the town’s development.

In 1857, Governor William Bissell signed a bill to create a normal school. Based on the French teaching schools, the term “normal” was the general name for all schools set up to be teachers’ colleges. The bill stipulated that the permanent location would be the place that offered the most favorable inducement. Jesse Fell took up the campaign for Bloomington and obtained financial backing totaling $141,000, which surpassed Peoria, the closest contender, by $61,000. Abraham Lincoln, in his capacity as an attorney, drew up the bond guaranteeing that Bloomington citizens would fulfill their financial commitments. The university first held classes in Bloomington while the campus was being built north of Bloomington. By 1861, Old Main, the all-purpose building for the university, was completed, and the state’s first public institution of higher education had a permanent home.

In 1865, the Town was founded under the name of Normal. Two years later in 1867, the Town of Normal was officially incorporated by state charter. Under the formal State of Illinois charter, a town government of five trustees was elected, sidewalks were constructed and the sale of “intoxicating drinks” was prohibited. This prohibition remained until the early 1970s.

Eighteen sixty-five also saw the passage of legislation to establish a home for Civil War Orphans. It was a former orphanage and child welfare institution that provided a home for children of disabled soldiers or orphaned children. Jesse Fell, in a process similar to that of acquiring Normal University, encouraged others to contribute in an effort to locate the home in Normal.

In 1867, the Civil War Orphans’ Home, later known as the Illinois Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Children’s School, was offered to the Town of Normal, and Normal accepted. It was a former orphanage and child welfare institution that provided a place for children. One of the largest and most festive events held in the young Town was the dedication ceremony of the home in 1869. People from all over the state came to witness the event. By 10 am, more than 5,000 people had gathered to witness the dedication.

Normal was the home of the only two state supported institutions in McLean County: the university and the new Illinois Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Children’s School. (source: https://www.normal.org/377/Town-History)

Normal Neighborhood

Check out Normal Neighborhood!

Normal is a larger medium-sized town located in the state of Illinois. With a population of 54,594 people and ten constituent neighborhoods, Normal is the 27th largest community in Illinois.

Normal is a decidedly white-collar town, with fully 89.22% of the workforce employed in white-collar jobs, well above the national average. Overall, Normal is a town of sales and office workers, professionals and service providers. There are especially a lot of people living in Normal who work in sales jobs (14.69%), office and administrative support (13.16%) and teaching (10.35%).

Also of interest is that Normal has more people living here who work in computers and math than 95% of the places in the US.

Because Normal has a very large number of students who are 18 years or older and in college, it is thought of as a college town. This has a major influence on local Normal lifestyle, entertainment, and culture in general. Life in Normal is very much tied to the academic calendar: when students return from the summer break in the fall, one will notice them out and about, buying groceries, out with friends, and generally getting re-acquainted with each other. In Normal people study hard and play hard, and there is ample opportunity to do both.

Not only is Normal a town with many college students, but it also retains many recent graduates who are looking to start new careers, creating a very large population of people who are young, single, educated, and upwardly-mobile. That’s because Normal is full of single people in their 20s and 30s and who have undergraduate or graduate degrees and are starting careers in professional occupations. This makes Normal a pretty good place for young, educated career starters looking to find many people like themselves, with good opportunities for friendships, socializing, romance, and fun.

One of the benefits of Normal is that there is very little traffic. The average commute to work is 17.91 minutes, which is substantially less than the national average. Not only does this mean that the drive to work is less aggravating, but noise and pollution levels are lower as a result.

Do you have a 4-year college degree or graduate degree? If so, you may feel right at home in Normal. 51.48% of adults here have a 4-year degree or graduate degree, whereas the national average for all cities and towns is just 21.84%.

The per capita income in Normal in 2010 was $24,881, which is middle income relative to Illinois and the nation. This equates to an annual income of $99,524 for a family of four. However, Normal contains both very wealthy and poor people as well.

Normal is a somewhat ethnically-diverse town. The people who call Normal home describe themselves as belonging to a variety of racial and ethnic groups. The greatest number of Normal residents report their race to be White, followed by Black or African-American. Important ancestries of people in Normal include German, Irish, English, Italian, Polish and Swedish. (source: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/il/normal/)

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Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.