LaCava Center Integrative Medical Highlights

Lyme Disease

Our knowledge of Lyme Disease surfaced in the early 1970s, when a mysterious group of rheumatoid arthritis cases occurred among children in Lyme, Connecticut, and two neighboring towns. Since then we have learned that Lyme Disease has been around for thousands upon thousands of years. It is caused by a corkscrew-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme can affect any organ of the body, including: muscles and joints, the brain and nervous system, and the heart. Lyme is called “The Great Imitator,” because its symptoms mimic many other diseases. Patients with Lyme disease are frequently misdiagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and various psychiatric illnesses, including depression. This has proven true at The LaCava Center where many patients who have been diagnosed with such illnesses, come to us only to find out that Lyme Disease was the culprit all along.

Lyme’s disease is primarily caused by a tick bite. However, it is also believed by many that Horsefly’s, Deer Fly’s, and other insects such as Mosquitoes are transmitters of the disease as well. Unfortunately, many people believe that if they are bitten by a tick that they only need to worry if a red bulls-eye shows up on their skin. Nothing could be further from the truth! It is estimated that only 16% of patients diagnosed with Lyme disease know of a tick bite, and only a third to a half of people have the bulls-eye rash. Furthermore, ticks are hosts to a number of other viruses and parasites including: Heartland Virus, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Babesiosis, Bartonella, and Anaplasmosis. Click here for more.

Although the prevailing logic is that Lyme is an East Coast disease, it is found throughout the United States, as well as in more than sixty other countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. About 1.5 times more than the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times more than the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the US. However, because of Lyme’s nature it often goes undetected leading many experts to believe the true number of cases is much higher.

At The LaCava Center we have noticed Lyme to be a very smart and debilitating disease. We have seen many cases of false negatives in lab testing and even cases where previous treatment proved ineffective resulting in Chronic Lyme. Such cases caused us to search for a lab with the expertise to properly test for Lyme’s existence. After trial and error, we found just such an experiences lab and now partner with it for almost all of our Lyme testing.

If you have suffered from a debilitating disease and have not gotten better, we encourage you to give us a call today. Also please feel free to check out some of the websites below for resources related to Lyme Disease.

www.lymedisease.org

www.cdc.gov

www.ilads.org

www.webmd.com

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Cancer

In 2016, there will be an estimated 1,685,210 new cancer cases diagnosed and 595,690 cancer deaths in the US. Cancer.org. It seems everyone has been touched in some way by this terrible epidemic. Either you know of someone who has had cancer or worse yet, you have cancer. For many, this diagnosis is almost a certified death sentence. But, at The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine we believe that it doesn’t have to be this way.

In the mid 90’s, Dr. LaCava was personally touched by cancer when his Father was diagnosed with stomach cancer. In essence, his Father became his first cancer patient. Since then, Dr. LaCava has treated hundreds of cancer patients spanning the spectrum of ages, stages, and types of cancer. Utilizing an Integrative Oncology approach, The LaCava Center utilizes evidence based complementary therapies in concert with traditional medical treatments, in an effort to improve overall efficacy and symptom control, while also working to alleviate patient distress and suffering. 

As a founding member of the International Organization of Integrative Cancer Physicians, Dr. LaCava has helped to pioneer the Integrative Oncology approach to cancer treatment, and further continues his ongoing and evolving education in this field through membership with such groups as Best Answer for Cancer. As an example of our practices ongoing evolution, with passage in Illinois of the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, and the opening of Medical Cannabis dispensaries in November of 2015, Dr. LaCava expanded The LaCava Center’s treatments by utilizing high THC medical cannabis as a therapy to alleviate pain in cancer patients. Moreover, encouraged by the research surrounding Cannabidiol (CBD) and it’s potential as an adjunctive cancer therapy, we have begun to explore its efficacy by utilizing high CBD and low THC strains of medical cannabis. By doing so, we continue to innovate and provide our patients with the very best that integrative and alternative medicine has to offer.

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Mold Exposure

Exposure to mold can be a very serious health concern that is often overlooked in conventional medicine. Mold and fungus produce very toxic chemicals called mycotoxins.

Different species of Mold produce different toxins and people will suffer a wide range of different symptoms. The symptom picture often includes:

  • Brain Fog
  • Depression or Mood Swings
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Skin Sensitivity and Rashes
  • Unexplained allergic sensitivities and immune hypersensitivity
  • Headaches
  • Breathing Problems
  • Memory Loss, short term
  • Chronic Sinusitis, Ear Infections or Bronchitis
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting

Mold Sickness and related illnesses from Mold Exposure are real. Mold has been linked to Lung Damage, Brain Damage, Cancer and even Death. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Journals of American Medicine, all agree that Mold Fine Particulate are dangerous to human health.

We work with Croft Pathology to have your excretion of mycotoxins measured. Testing of your environment may also be warranted to determine the site and degree of exposure. In some cases a tissue biopsy may be necessary, this can be helpful in legal cases.

Upon determination of mycotoxin severity, a treatment protocol will be implemented. This may include, dietary changes, nutritional supplements, pharmaceutical anti-fungals, therapeutic baths and recommendations for your living or work environment.

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Ozone Therapy (Oxidative IV)

Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

To understand Bio-oxidative Medicine it is important to first differentiate the terms Oxygenation and Oxidation. These terms refer to two different metabolic processes that are unrelated.

Oxygenation signifies an increase in the number of oxygen molecules especially as it relates to the uptake and utilization of oxygen at the cellular level. Although Oxygenation therapies can help improve health, they are not part of Bio-oxidative Medicine. However, Oxygenation therapies can be used in conjunction with the therapies used in Bio-oxidative Medicine.

In chemistry, Oxidation is the loss or transfer of electrons from one atom or molecule to another. The opposite of oxidation is reduction in which electrons are gained. Together, this exchange of electrons, called reduction and oxidation, is referred to as redox. All life processes are dependent upon redox. Redox initiates chemical reactions. Life and healing are dependent on a dynamic chemical balance in the body and that chemical balance is dependent on redox. Improving healthy redox is the foundation of Bio-Oxidative Medicine.

As a result of many factors in modern life, such as excess stress, poor nutrition, exposure to radiation and pollution of our air, water and food, the body’s oxidative and antioxidant systems can become overwhelmed. This results in a negative effect on the function of the cells in the body and on the body’s immune system and its ability to defend against infections, allergens, toxins, carcinogens and other stresses of life. Bio-oxidative therapies, like the use of Hydrogen Peroxide Therapy and Ozone Therapy, stimulate the body’s redox systems and help return the body to balance and health.Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

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Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT)

Insulin potentiation therapy (IPT) has been around for a long time. IPT was discovered by Donato Perez Garcia, M.D., and developed by him in Mexico City during the 1930s and 1940s. Following its discovery, its chief practitioners were three generations of the Garcia doctors, who called it cellular therapy or Donatian therapy. In the 1970s or 1980s it was renamed IPT.

IPT (Insulin Potentiation Therapy) is a medical procedure that uses the hormone insulin, followed by glucose, to deliver drugs to the body in smaller doses. The process helps to utilize and concentrate the particular drugs introduced, thus helping to make them more effective, while also helping to reduce possible side effects.

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Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.

Oshkosh Integrative Medicine

Oshkosh, Wisconsin

The City of Oshkosh, (population 66,083 as of the 2010 census), is an award-winning community in the heart of the Fox River Valley, about 90 miles north of Milwaukee and 50 miles south of Green Bay. Oshkosh is a progressive and participative community that offers small-town friendliness with big city features and a high quality of life for people of all ages and interests.

The City encompasses 24 square miles. It is the largest municipality in Winnebago County, which has a population of over 159,972 within its borders.

Oshkosh is served by US Highways 41 and 45 and State Highways 21, 44, and 76, Wittman Regional Airport, the Outagamie County Regional Airport (20 miles), and General Mitchell International Airport (80 Miles).

Oshkosh is a great place to live as a result of an excellent school system, outstanding health care facilities, abundant entertainment opportunities, a low cost of living, a clean environment, and much more. The attributes of Oshkosh include its parks, galleries, nationally accredited museums, golf courses, entertainment venues, festivals, and activities that make Oshkosh a haven for anyone interested in combining city life with the benefits of a small town.

Oshkosh and the surrounding area boast an abundance of sights and sounds for residents and visitors to discover and enjoy. The city is on the western shore of Lake Winnebago (217 square miles) and banked by the Fox River and Lake Butte des Morts (8,800 acres).

Oshkosh has been ranked in Money Magazine’s “Top 100 Best Places to Live in the United States”, in 2009 Business Week ranked Oshkosh as “The Best Place in Wisconsin to Raise Kids” and the Oshkosh metro area was named one of the “50 Smart Places to Live” in the United States by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance in June of 2006. Rankings were based upon the amount and quality of affordable housing, a reasonable cost of living, quality of life, access to health care, and a strong economy. (source: http://www.ci.oshkosh.wi.us/about_us.asp)

Things To Do In Oshkosh:

Come Spend A Day In Oshkosh!

Leach Amphitheater
Located at the mouth of the historic Fox River in downtown Oshkosh, where the water opens up to the breathtaking views of Lake Winnebago, the Leach Amphitheater is a spectacular venue for community festivals, live concerts of all types, company outings, and large-scale sporting or fund-raising events. A romantic gazebo overlooking the lake is a stunning setting for weddings, anniversary parties, or other more intimate gatherings

Lakeshore Municipal Golf Course
Lakeshore offers a full practice range, 18 holes, a clubhouse featuring a deck that overlooks the Fox River, and a friendly staff who look forward to serving individual golfers and groups alike. We invite you to experience Lakeshore’s rich history and be a part of our promising future.

Oshkosh Museum
For more than 90 years, the Oshkosh Public Museum has been entrusted with the documentation, preservation, care, management and exhibition of material representing the history and heritage of Oshkosh and the Lake Winnebago region

Menominee Park Zoo
The zoo is approximately 8 acres and carries 30-50 animals during the season. We entertain and educate over 90,000 visitors per year including over 3,500 children on educational field trips

Senior Services
The Center is open to the public and targets its services to persons age 50+. The Center provides a wide variety of services, activities, and events throughout the year ranging from Center activities to Community events. (source: http://www.ci.oshkosh.wi.us)

Education in Oshkosh

About Oshkosh educational system

Oshkosh has 15 public elementary schools, six public middle schools, and two high schools operated by the Oshkosh Area School District. The high schools in the Oshkosh Area School District are Oshkosh North High School and Oshkosh West High School.

Private schools in the city include Grace Lutheran School (pre-K to 8th grade), Martin Luther School (pre-K to 8th grade), Lourdes High School, and Valley Christian High School.

The University of Wisconsin–Oshkosh, the third largest university in the state, is located in Oshkosh. The downtown campus serves approximately 14,000 students and employs 1,700 staff. Higher education is also served by a campus of the Fox Valley Technical College

Oshkosh Area School District is a school district located in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. It has about 11,000 students and operates 15 elementary schools, five middle schools, two high schools, and one charter school housed within the Perry Tipler Middle School building. the district is governed by a seven-person Board of Education which is elected at large for three-year terms, as well as a superintendent of schools. The current board president is Steve Dedow, and the current superintendent is Stan F. Mack II.

Oshkosh North High School is a public secondary/high school located in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Part of the Oshkosh Area School District, the school serves students in grades 9 through 12. As of 2016, there are 1,249 students enrolled at the school. It is referred to by students as “North”. The school mascot is the Spartan. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oshkosh,_Wisconsin#Education)

 

History Of Oshkosh:

Oshkosh is rich in history!

Oshkosh was named for Menominee Chief Oshkosh, whose name meant “claw” (cf. Ojibwe oshkanzh, “the claw”). Although the fur trade brought the first European settlers to the area as early as 1818, it never became a major player in the fur trade. It was the establishment and growth of the lumber industry in the area that spurred development of Oshkosh. Oshkosh was incorporated as a city in 1853, although it had already been designated the county seat, and had a population of nearly 2,800.

The lumber industry became well established as businessmen took advantage of navigable waterways to provide access to both markets and northern pineries. The 1859 arrival of rail transportation expanded the ability to meet the demands of a rapidly growing construction market. At one time, Oshkosh was known as the “Sawdust Capital of the World” due to the number of lumber mills in the city, 11 by 1860. By 1874, there were 47 sawmills and 15 shingle mills. By 1870, Oshkosh had become the third-largest city in Wisconsin with a population of over 12,000. The Oshkosh Daily Northwestern newspaper (now the Oshkosh Northwestern) was founded around this time, as was the Oshkosh State Normal School (now the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh). On April 28, 1875, Oshkosh had a “Great Fire” that consumed homes and businesses along Main Street north of the Fox River. The fire had engulfed 70 stores, 40 factories, and 500 homes costing nearly $2.5 million (or $51.2 million in 2010 money) in damage.

Around 1900 Oshkosh was home of the Oshkosh Brewing Company, which coined the marketing slogan “By Gosh It’s Good.” Its Chief Oshkosh became a nationally distributed beer. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oshkosh,_Wisconsin#History)

Oshkosh Neighborhood

Check out Oshkosh Neighborhood!

Oshkosh is a larger medium-sized city located in the state of Wisconsin. With a population of 66,621 people and 20 constituent neighborhoods, Oshkosh is the eighth largest community in Wisconsin.

Unlike some cities where white-collar or blue-collar occupations dominate the local economy, Oshkosh is neither predominantly one nor the other. Instead, it has a mixed workforce of both white- and blue-collar jobs. Overall, Oshkosh is a city of sales and office workers, service providers and professionals. There are especially a lot of people living in Oshkosh who work in office and administrative support (14.07%), sales jobs (11.52%) and food service (9.55%).

Oshkosh is also a college town, where lots of students live while attending area colleges. Because of the high percentage of people living in Oshkosh enrolled in college, Oshkosh has a number of services, amenities and opportunities geared towards the needs and activities of students.

One of the benefits of Oshkosh is that there is very little traffic. The average commute to work is 18.56 minutes, which is substantially less than the national average. Not only does this mean that the drive to work is less aggravating, but noise and pollution levels are lower as a result.

The people who call Oshkosh home describe themselves as belonging to a variety of racial and ethnic groups. The greatest number of Oshkosh residents report their race to be White, followed by Black or African-American. Important ancestries of people in Oshkosh include German, Irish, Polish, English, French and Norwegian. (source: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/wi/oshkosh/)

Reach Out For More Info!

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Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.