LaCava Center Integrative Medical Highlights

Lyme Disease

Our knowledge of Lyme Disease surfaced in the early 1970s, when a mysterious group of rheumatoid arthritis cases occurred among children in Lyme, Connecticut, and two neighboring towns. Since then we have learned that Lyme Disease has been around for thousands upon thousands of years. It is caused by a corkscrew-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi. Lyme can affect any organ of the body, including: muscles and joints, the brain and nervous system, and the heart. Lyme is called “The Great Imitator,” because its symptoms mimic many other diseases. Patients with Lyme disease are frequently misdiagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, and various psychiatric illnesses, including depression. This has proven true at The LaCava Center where many patients who have been diagnosed with such illnesses, come to us only to find out that Lyme Disease was the culprit all along.

Lyme’s disease is primarily caused by a tick bite. However, it is also believed by many that Horsefly’s, Deer Fly’s, and other insects such as Mosquitoes are transmitters of the disease as well. Unfortunately, many people believe that if they are bitten by a tick that they only need to worry if a red bulls-eye shows up on their skin. Nothing could be further from the truth! It is estimated that only 16% of patients diagnosed with Lyme disease know of a tick bite, and only a third to a half of people have the bulls-eye rash. Furthermore, ticks are hosts to a number of other viruses and parasites including: Heartland Virus, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Babesiosis, Bartonella, and Anaplasmosis. Click here for more.

Although the prevailing logic is that Lyme is an East Coast disease, it is found throughout the United States, as well as in more than sixty other countries. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. About 1.5 times more than the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times more than the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the US. However, because of Lyme’s nature it often goes undetected leading many experts to believe the true number of cases is much higher.

At The LaCava Center we have noticed Lyme to be a very smart and debilitating disease. We have seen many cases of false negatives in lab testing and even cases where previous treatment proved ineffective resulting in Chronic Lyme. Such cases caused us to search for a lab with the expertise to properly test for Lyme’s existence. After trial and error, we found just such an experiences lab and now partner with it for almost all of our Lyme testing.

If you have suffered from a debilitating disease and have not gotten better, we encourage you to give us a call today. Also please feel free to check out some of the websites below for resources related to Lyme Disease.

www.lymedisease.org

www.cdc.gov

www.ilads.org

www.webmd.com

LEARN MORE

Cancer

In 2016, there will be an estimated 1,685,210 new cancer cases diagnosed and 595,690 cancer deaths in the US. Cancer.org. It seems everyone has been touched in some way by this terrible epidemic. Either you know of someone who has had cancer or worse yet, you have cancer. For many, this diagnosis is almost a certified death sentence. But, at The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine we believe that it doesn’t have to be this way.

In the mid 90’s, Dr. LaCava was personally touched by cancer when his Father was diagnosed with stomach cancer. In essence, his Father became his first cancer patient. Since then, Dr. LaCava has treated hundreds of cancer patients spanning the spectrum of ages, stages, and types of cancer. Utilizing an Integrative Oncology approach, The LaCava Center utilizes evidence based complementary therapies in concert with traditional medical treatments, in an effort to improve overall efficacy and symptom control, while also working to alleviate patient distress and suffering. 

As a founding member of the International Organization of Integrative Cancer Physicians, Dr. LaCava has helped to pioneer the Integrative Oncology approach to cancer treatment, and further continues his ongoing and evolving education in this field through membership with such groups as Best Answer for Cancer. As an example of our practices ongoing evolution, with passage in Illinois of the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, and the opening of Medical Cannabis dispensaries in November of 2015, Dr. LaCava expanded The LaCava Center’s treatments by utilizing high THC medical cannabis as a therapy to alleviate pain in cancer patients. Moreover, encouraged by the research surrounding Cannabidiol (CBD) and it’s potential as an adjunctive cancer therapy, we have begun to explore its efficacy by utilizing high CBD and low THC strains of medical cannabis. By doing so, we continue to innovate and provide our patients with the very best that integrative and alternative medicine has to offer.

LEARN MORE

Mold Exposure

Exposure to mold can be a very serious health concern that is often overlooked in conventional medicine. Mold and fungus produce very toxic chemicals called mycotoxins.

Different species of Mold produce different toxins and people will suffer a wide range of different symptoms. The symptom picture often includes:

  • Brain Fog
  • Depression or Mood Swings
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Skin Sensitivity and Rashes
  • Unexplained allergic sensitivities and immune hypersensitivity
  • Headaches
  • Breathing Problems
  • Memory Loss, short term
  • Chronic Sinusitis, Ear Infections or Bronchitis
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting

Mold Sickness and related illnesses from Mold Exposure are real. Mold has been linked to Lung Damage, Brain Damage, Cancer and even Death. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Journals of American Medicine, all agree that Mold Fine Particulate are dangerous to human health.

We work with Croft Pathology to have your excretion of mycotoxins measured. Testing of your environment may also be warranted to determine the site and degree of exposure. In some cases a tissue biopsy may be necessary, this can be helpful in legal cases.

Upon determination of mycotoxin severity, a treatment protocol will be implemented. This may include, dietary changes, nutritional supplements, pharmaceutical anti-fungals, therapeutic baths and recommendations for your living or work environment.

LEARN MORE

Ozone Therapy (Oxidative IV)

Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

To understand Bio-oxidative Medicine it is important to first differentiate the terms Oxygenation and Oxidation. These terms refer to two different metabolic processes that are unrelated.

Oxygenation signifies an increase in the number of oxygen molecules especially as it relates to the uptake and utilization of oxygen at the cellular level. Although Oxygenation therapies can help improve health, they are not part of Bio-oxidative Medicine. However, Oxygenation therapies can be used in conjunction with the therapies used in Bio-oxidative Medicine.

In chemistry, Oxidation is the loss or transfer of electrons from one atom or molecule to another. The opposite of oxidation is reduction in which electrons are gained. Together, this exchange of electrons, called reduction and oxidation, is referred to as redox. All life processes are dependent upon redox. Redox initiates chemical reactions. Life and healing are dependent on a dynamic chemical balance in the body and that chemical balance is dependent on redox. Improving healthy redox is the foundation of Bio-Oxidative Medicine.

As a result of many factors in modern life, such as excess stress, poor nutrition, exposure to radiation and pollution of our air, water and food, the body’s oxidative and antioxidant systems can become overwhelmed. This results in a negative effect on the function of the cells in the body and on the body’s immune system and its ability to defend against infections, allergens, toxins, carcinogens and other stresses of life. Bio-oxidative therapies, like the use of Hydrogen Peroxide Therapy and Ozone Therapy, stimulate the body’s redox systems and help return the body to balance and health.Bio-oxidative Medicine is the term first used by Charles Farr, M.D., Ph.D., in 1986 to describe utilizing the principles of oxidation to improve health. For this work, Dr. Farr was nominated to receive the 1993 Nobel Prize for Medicine.

LEARN MORE

Insulin Potentiation Therapy (IPT)

Insulin potentiation therapy (IPT) has been around for a long time. IPT was discovered by Donato Perez Garcia, M.D., and developed by him in Mexico City during the 1930s and 1940s. Following its discovery, its chief practitioners were three generations of the Garcia doctors, who called it cellular therapy or Donatian therapy. In the 1970s or 1980s it was renamed IPT.

IPT (Insulin Potentiation Therapy) is a medical procedure that uses the hormone insulin, followed by glucose, to deliver drugs to the body in smaller doses. The process helps to utilize and concentrate the particular drugs introduced, thus helping to make them more effective, while also helping to reduce possible side effects.

LEARN MORE

Reach Out For More Info!

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your Phone (required)

Your Message

Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.

Raleigh Integrative Medicine

Raleigh, North Carolina

Raleigh  is the capital of the state of North Carolina, the seat of Wake County in the United States. Raleigh is known as the “City of Oaks” for its many oak trees, which line the streets in the heart of the city. The city covers a land area of 142.8 square miles (370 km2). The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the city’s population as 451,066 as of July 1, 2015. It is also one of the fastest-growing cities in the country. The city of Raleigh is named after Sir Walter Raleigh, who established the lost Roanoke Colony in present-day Dare County.

Raleigh is home to North Carolina State University and is part of the Research Triangle area, together with Durham (home of Duke University) and Chapel Hill (home of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). The “Triangle” nickname originated after the 1959 creation of the Research Triangle Park, located in Durham and Wake Counties, partway between the three cities and their universities. The Research Triangle region encompasses the U.S. Census Bureau’s Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Combined Statistical Area (CSA), which had an estimated population of 2,037,430 in 2013. The Raleigh Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) had an estimated population of 1,214,516 in 2013.

Raleigh is an early example in the United States of a planned city. It was chosen as the site of the state capital in 1788 and incorporated in 1792 as such. The city was originally laid out in a grid pattern with the North Carolina State Capitol in Union Square at the center. In the United States Civil War the city was spared from any significant battle, only falling in the closing days of the war, though it did not escape the economic hardships that plagued the rest of the American South during the Reconstruction Era. The twentieth century saw the opening of the Research Triangle Park in 1959, and with the jobs it created the region and city saw a large influx of population, making it one of the fastest growing communities in the United States by the early 21st century. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raleigh,_North_Carolina)

Things To Do In Raleigh:

Come Spend A Day In Raleigh!

Downtown Raleigh, with museums of every stripe, warrants its nickname “Smithsonian of the South.” Twenty institutions comprise a diverse wonderland for inquisitive minds and hearts, emphasizing everything from hands-on interactive exhibits for children to the history of Harley-Davidson drag racing. The best news is that many of these showcases are free. Foremost are the North Carolina Museum of Arts, which boasts 30 Rodin sculptures, and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, which features a Living Conservatory filled with hummingbirds and butterflies.

The 25 blocks of Oakwood Historic District, once slated for destruction to make room for a major thoroughfare, now represent one of the top attractions in Raleigh. This entire neighborhood is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Working-class homes reflect diverse architectural styles, including Queen Anne, Classical Revival and Bungalow. Although development started shortly after the American Civil War, most of the building occurred between 1890 and 1930. Visitors interested in self-guided walking tours of this lovely neighborhood will find maps at the North Carolina Museum of History.

Located in the Piedmont, a plateau separating the Appalachian Mountains from the eastern coastal plain, Raleigh is surrounded by natural beauty. Responding to public fears that rapid growth was destroying this beauty, city government created the Capital Area Greenway System in 1974. The greenway’s 3,700 acres include more than 77 miles of sightseeing trails.

Just outside the city, to the southwest, lies Jordan Lake, among the area’s top attractions for nature lovers. With more than 14,000 acres of water, the lake offers ample area to cast a fishing line or glide over the water behind a ski boat. Two observation platforms for viewing the majestic bald eagle yield an unforgettable experience to the patient visitor. Another top draw for tourists who enjoy the natural world is the renowned JC Raulston Arboretum. North Carolina State University operates this 10-acre collection of more than 5,000 landscape plants.

A night out on the town in Raleigh may be as simple as savoring a plate of mountain trout accompanied by live jazz at the Irregardless Café. A special occasion might call for catching a theatrical production, dance performance or concert at the Progress Energy Center for the Performing Arts. The center’s four venues range from the classic 2,300-seat Memorial Auditorium to the intimate and experimental Kennedy Theater. Built in 1932, the renovated Memorial Auditorium blends the opulent grace of a former era with state-of-the-art lighting and acoustics. The modern Kennedy’s black-box environment blurs the line between players and audience, igniting the imagination—just like a trip to Raleigh itself. (source: https://www.mapquest.com/us/nc/raleigh-282039431)

Education in Raleigh

About Raleigh educational system

Higher education

Public

  • North Carolina State University
  • Wake Technical Community College

Private

  • Campbell University Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law (Baptist)
  • Meredith College (Baptist)
  • Montreat College’s School of Professional and Adult Studies (Presbyterian)
  • William Peace University (Presbyterian)
  • Shaw University (Baptist)
  • Skema Business School, the first French Business School to open a campus in the USA
  • St. Augustine’s University (Episcopal)

Private, for profit

  • ECPI College of Technology
  • The Medical Arts School
  • Strayer University

Primary and secondary education

Public schools

Public schools in Raleigh are operated by the Wake County Public School System. Observers have praised the Wake County Public School System for its innovative efforts to maintain a socially, economically and racial balanced system by using income as a prime factor in assigning students to schools. Raleigh is home to three magnet high schools and three high schools offering the International Baccalaureate program. There are four early college high schools in Raleigh. Raleigh also has two alternative high schools.

Wake County Public high schools in Raleigh include:

Traditional schools
  • Athens Drive High School
  • Needham B. Broughton High School (International Baccalaureate)
  • Leesville Road High School
  • Jesse O. Sanderson High School
  • Wakefield High School
Magnet schools
  • William G. Enloe GT/IB Center for the Humanities, Sciences, and the Arts (International Baccalaureate)
  • Millbrook High School (International Baccalaureate)
  • Southeast Raleigh Magnet High School

(source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raleigh,_North_Carolina#Education)

History Of Raleigh:

Raleigh is rich in history!

In the first decade of the 21st century, Raleigh was featured prominently in a number of “Top 10 Lists”, including those by Forbes, MSNBC and Money magazine, due to its quality of life and business climate.

In 2001, the Raleigh Memorial Auditorium complex was expanded with the addition of the Progress Energy Center for the Performing Arts, Meymandi Concert Hall, Fletcher Opera Theater, Kennedy Theatre, Betty Ray McCain Gallery and Lichtin Plaza.

Fayetteville Street reopened to vehicular traffic in 2006. A variety of downtown building projects began around this time including the 34-story RBC Bank Tower, multiple condominium projects and several new restaurants. Additional skyscrapers are in the proposal/planning phase.

In 2006, the city’s NHL franchise, the Carolina Hurricanes won the Stanley Cup, North Carolina’s first and only professional sports championship.

With the opening of parts of I-540 from 2005 to 2007, a new 70-mile (110 km) loop around Wake County, traffic congestion eased somewhat in the North Raleigh area. Completion of the entire loop is expected to take another 15 years.

In 2008, the city’s Fayetteville Street Historic District joined the National Register of Historic Places.

In September 2010, Raleigh hosted the inaugural Hopscotch Music Festival.

In January 2011, Raleigh hosted the National Hockey League All-Star Game.

In April 2011, a devastating EF-3 tornado hit Raleigh, and many other tornadoes touched down in the state (ultimately the largest, but not the strongest (1984 Carolinas tornado outbreak) outbreak to ever hit the state), killing 24 people. The tornado tracked northeast through parts of Downtown, East Central Raleigh and Northeast Raleigh and produced $115 million in damages in Wake County. There were 4 fatalities in the city. (source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raleigh,_North_Carolina#History)

Raleigh Neighborhood

Check out Raleigh Neighborhood!

Raleigh is a large city located in the state of North Carolina. With a population of 438,759 people and 100 constituent neighborhoods, Raleigh is the second largest community in North Carolina.

Raleigh real estate is some of the most expensive in North Carolina, although Raleigh house values don’t compare to the most expensive real estate in the U.S.

Raleigh is a decidedly white-collar city, with fully 87.45% of the workforce employed in white-collar jobs, well above the national average. Overall, Raleigh is a city of professionals, sales and office workers and managers. There are especially a lot of people living in Raleigh who work in office and administrative support (12.56%), sales jobs (12.20%) and management occupations (11.91%).

Also of interest is that Raleigh has more people living here who work in computers and math than 95% of the places in the US.

In addition, Raleigh also has a very large population of students, making it a major college town. As often the case, having so many students around has a strong influence on the local culture. In fact, Raleigh is one of only a few big cities that are also major college towns, making it one of the nation’s prominent intellectual centers. In addition, the presence of thousands of college students gives Raleigh a sophisticated style, and provides lots of diversions and entertainment for students. Being a big “college town” not only means that Raleigh has a burgeoning arts, music, and nightclub scene, but the innovation sector of the local economy receives a great boost from both the intellectual output of the faculty and the thousands of enthusiastic students who graduate every spring.

The citizens of Raleigh are among the most well-educated in the nation: 47.64% of adults in Raleigh have a bachelor’s degree or even advanced degree, whereas the average US city has 21.84% holding at least a bachelor’s degree.(source: https://www.neighborhoodscout.com/nc/raleigh/)

Reach Out For More Info!

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your Phone (required)

Your Message

Robert J. LaCava

M.D. / Founder

Robert LaCava, M.D. founded The LaCava Center for Integrative Medicine over 10 years ago. He partners with patients to achieve their ideal health, through alternative and traditional treatments. Dr. LaCava has four children, three grandchildren and more sure to follow. During his spare time he enjoys grilling out and spending time with family. He also is passionate about helping others with limited resources, and recently experienced a life changing medical mission trip to Africa. His dream is to return and continue helping to heal those sick and in desperate need.